1st EDITION LITERARY REVIEWS

REVOLUTION / THE SECRET HISTORY OF THE BEATLES
???Writer, actor and radio-show host Giuliano (Dark Horse, 1991, etc.) adds to his Beatles oeuvre (a second volume on Harrison is already in the works) with this basic run through of the highs and lows the four members of the Beatles collectively and individually endured; he is aided by his daughter Avalon. They begin with a dedication to the founder of the Hare Krishna movement, A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, which immediately brings to mind the most spiritual member of the Beatles, George Harrison. Indeed, the authors conclude with a touching tribute to Harrison, whose death is among the most recent events they cover…There is a hint that Giuliano and Harrison bonded over spirituality: The dedication to the Swami offers a clue, as does an e-mail sent to Giuliano from a Krishna monk who met Harrison shortly before his death.???
BooklistSeptember 15, 2006

???Drawing on a variety of published and online sources, as well as exclusive interviews with many of the principals, this latest Beatles bio focuses on an aspect of the group with which some fans may not be sufficiently familiar. Although the group’s public image was one of playfulness and big smiles, the Fab Four were often mired in internal politics and conflict. The book details the enormous pressures the Beatles operated under and shows that, in addition to musicians, they very quickly had to become businessmen and diplomats. The Giuliano???s also offer up an assortment of trivia tidbits that may come as a surprise to some readers. For instance: Paul sang lead vocals on “Love Me Do,” although it was supposed to be John; a key line in “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” was a blooper; John, not Ringo, played drums on “Back in the USSR.” The book’s usefulness to Beatle fans will depend entirely on how much they have already read about the group, but one thing is certain: for the average reader, it’s an eye-opener.???
David Pitt, American Library Association

???I wasn’t sure exactly how much of this story is “secret”. John Lennon getting regular blowjobs from a Hamburg transvestite? The Beatles’ longtime roadie apparently deprived of royalties for a song he co-wrote? The boys jamming in a hotel room with Elvis? Perhaps you knew this already. Still, the authors draw on personal interviews and apparently unique tape-recordings; and whatever the epistemological status hitherto of particular details, the story is colorfully told, with a particular emphasis on the Krishna connection. Much attention is lavished on scenes of meditating with the Maharishi, Beach Boy Mike Love and Mia Farrow on the Ganges, and George Harrison emerges as the book’s spiritual hero. My favorite bit was what looks like a verbatim transcript of a surreal conversation about the imagery of “I am the Walrus” between Lennon and Samuel Beckett in a Manhattan bar. As the liquor flows, Beckett is given to joyous exclamations: “Ah, wonderful blubber! The sight of it! … There can never be enough blubber!???
The GuardianAugust 5, 2006

GIULIANO RESCUES THE BEATLES FROM UNDER A MOUTAIN OF SPIN!
???As a long time fan of Geoffrey Giuliano’s work I was happy to see this brave new work in stores. Giuliano’s gift is his unique ability to capture his subjects as they really are rather than how a fanatic fringe of hero worshipping fans might wish them to be. The Beatles (and John Lennon particularly so) set the world on it’s ear by offering up their own truth, but as time passed they insolated themselves with a monumental amount of highly paid spin and their elemental core truth was lost. Giuliano picked up the gauntlet and set foot into the lions den with his work daring to lay bare the mountain of ill conceived myth and legend surrounding (and encouraged by) the Beatles. In so doing he alienated a very small minority of biased fans, but illuminated countless others with his telling prose and well researched, detailed, slice of life literary style. I read it, loved it and highly recommend it to anyone sincerely interested in trying to understand the reality of these four very talented, very human beings and their amazing times. If that position makes me unpopular with a few airy fairy fans then I happily join with Giuliano in his brave search for the ultimate truth about the Beatles as people. Read this book if you are genuinely interested in a deconstructed, dispassionate, controversial, highly literary look at the Fab Four! Kudos Geoffrey, keep on fighting the good fight. John Lennon would be proud!???
Chidern Dwyer DokesMay 17, 2006

COMPASSIONATE CUISINE
GOURMET VEGETARIAN RECIPES & THE PHILOSOPHY AND CULTURE OF CARING
(Vrnda Devi With Geoffrey Giuliano)
???A cookbook with a conscience, it takes a holistic approach to vegetarianism. Devi blends eastern philosophy, spirituality and nutrition with original recipes to embrace not only an animal-free diet but a humanitarian lifestyle. Animal welfare is the cornerstone of this compelling and enriching work.???
ASPCA Animal Watch2001
???Celebrated vegetarian gourmet Vrnda Devi examines the negative effects of chemicals in a meat-based diet; outlines the benefits of a vegetarian diet rich in unprocessed fruits, vegetables, milk, whole grains and nuts; and explains how such a diet can help heal, strengthen and purify the body.???
A Cooks.Com Recommend Book2004

LENNON IN AMERICA
BASED IN PART ON THE LOST LENNON DIARIES 1971-1980
???Lennon in America is a warts and all account of Lennon’s years in the US, between 1971 and 1980, the year he was murdered. Its author, Geoffrey Giuliano, doesn’t pull any punches, choosing to begin the book with a rather salacious prologue detailing some of Lennon’s many sexual experiences. Giuliano attempts to offer some insight into Lennon’s psyche, saying the “true saga” of Lennon began when he was 14 and his mother made a pass at him.
Lennon grew up into an adult with “no perspective, nothing to check the rage of the lonely child bruised by Oedipal confusion and blatant abandonment”, writes Giuliano. This may well be true, but this revelation, plus others including Lennon’s confusion over his sexuality and his violent tendencies seemed rather sordid when condensed into a single chapter. It is hard to know what Giuliano intended by putting all this information together. The rest of the novel is less of a surprise – giving a chronological account of Lennon’s life in the US from 1971 onwards, when he left the UK never to return again.
The book details much about Lennon’s tempestuous relationship with second wife Yoko and his elder son Julian, as well as his difficulty raising his younger son Sean. Yoko Ono comes out of the book particularly badly, and is often depicted as a wife who needed to control her husband, usually to his detriment. The book also claims that Ono had decided before Lennon’s death that she would end the marriage.
Luciano Sparacino, who did renovations for the Lennons, is quoted as saying he was told by Ono in 1980: “I’m bored with John, tired of the Lennon name, and tired of living in his shadow. As soon as the album is off the ground the marriage is over. I’m planning to leave him.” The bio also claims that Lennon struggled with a heroin addiction, voracious sexual appetite and many neuroses. But aside from these revelations, many of which have been documented, the book also tries to offer insight into Lennon’s day-to-day existence with Yoko, and latterly, Sean. It says he lived a reclusive lifestyle, often trying to stick to the stringent diets Yoko put him on, while struggling to maintain the musical success he had enjoyed with The Beatles.
It also details his often strained relationship with his former songwriting partner Paul McCartney, as well as the pair’s happier moments. Giuliano said he trawled through Lennon’s unpublished diaries, but rather than publish their contents he used them as backup for his interviews. He said he spoke to many people to gain eyewitness accounts, including Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Lennon’s sometime lover May Pang.
This book will no doubt be a must for Lennon fans the world over, as long as they do not mind their hero being knocked firmly off his pedestal. It is a riveting read and Lennon comes across as a rather tragic character, whose stunning success won him the adoration of millions. But as the old adage goes – it was not enough to make him happy.
Geoffrey Giuliano’s Lennon in America claims to be a warts and all account of Lennon’s years in the US, between 1971 and 1980, the year he was murdered. It details huge amounts of personal information about the former Beatle, from his tempestuous relationship with Yoko Ono to his neuroses about his weight and addictions. “Despite the salacious nature of the book, it is a riveting read. Lennon comes across as a rather tragic character who desperately searched for happiness.???
Helen Bushby / BBC NewsOctober 14, 2001
???John Lennon???s diaries and private letters reveal a lonely obsessive trapped in a miserable marriage in January 1979, from his 12-room apartment in New York John Lennon typed a letter to his cousin Leila in England. The correspondence, which has not been published before, reveals a chatty, if abbreviated style. In the light of his assassination in December 1980, one paragraph is particularly poignant. He wrote: a I???m 40 next year – I hope life begins – ie. I’d like a little less trouble and more – what?
The letter forms part of a Lennon archive collected by biographer Geoffrey Giuliano, which includes the former Beatle’s diaries from his explosive new book, Lennon in America, on these journals, building up an extraordinary picture of a genius whose creative powers faded as he submitted himself to a lonely, obsessive existence under the domination of his second wife, Yoko Ono.
Giuliano describes a volatile, crumbling and increasingly sexless marriage in which Yoko restricted his access to friends, family and the other Beatles. Under pressure, Lennon???s latent addictiveness came to the fore. He sought sadomasochistic sex; suffered an eating disorder in which he see-sawed between gorging on chocolate (purging himself by vomiting) and an ascetic rice diet; and indulged heavily in drugs from marijuana to heroin.
The misery of Lennon???s last years, beset by paranoia, agoraphobia and deep depression, comes through acutely. He had the gold-plated curse of being a Beatle,” says Giuliano, who received death threats when his book was published in the US. This week, Giuliano showed me copies of Lennon???s letters and diaries the latter in the musician’s large, looping hand and in typed transcripts. As he became increasingly reclusive, Lennon noted the minutiae of his life, recording bowel functions, clinically describing sex acts (“got up. Fucked the wife…”) and more minor illnesses which caused him to take to his bed for days. One entry detailed a typical night in 1975: he was alone, consuming shepherd’s pie and ice cream and watching films such as jailhouse rock and Rosemary’s baby.
In his book Giuliano seldom quotes the diaries directly, which he acquired from a friend, the songwriter harry Nilsson. “John had been thinking of doing an autobiography and was afraid that Yoko would find out, and gave copies to Nilsson,” he says. Unsure of his right to publish them, Giuliano was advised that Lennon and his estate owned the expression of the ideas but not the ideas themselves. If he paraphrased the diaries contents, he would not breach copyright law.
Giuliano also extracted information from audio tapes, one of which he acquired from Lennon???s uncle, Norman Birch. On one tape, Lennon quizzes Ono about her sexual history. Why did they record their conversation? “They thought everything they did was high art, every squeak and squawk. They were doing it for posterity…or for me to get my hands on. “
Lennon and Ono married in March 1969. In September 1971 they moved to New York because, says Giuliano, Ono’s ambitions could not be satisfied in Berkshire. According to Giuliano, the move was the beginning of Lennon’s undoing.
“I think she was jealous of him, he says. “imagine living with someone the whole world loves, knowing you’re a universal object of derision. She wanted no one around but those who were loyal to her. If you wanted to get to john, you had to suck up to her.”
In a letter to his cousin Leila, dated “after birth 1975” (a reference to the birth of his son Sean), Lennon said he planned to visit his family in England , but this never happened. Although he was not included this detail in the book Giuliano claims Lennon longed to return to England. “he wanted to buy a farm in wales , be a gentleman farmer and write children’s books and historical fiction, but that was no good for Yoko, who wanted to keep the Yoko parade going.” Giuliano claims Ono blocked his contacts from home and listed in on his calls. “When Julia (Lennon???s half-sister, Julia Baird) rang, she would hear john shouting, “get off the line, or I???ll come in there and kick the fuck out of you!” such threats of violence were not without foundation: Lennon had hit all the women in his life, and even showed his temper to his baby son, Sean. In one unforgettable diary entry, Lennon on says he frightened the baby and hoped that Sean would forgive him. In the unpublished 1975 letter to Leila, john referred to his past which might reflect on this propensity to hitting out: “it’s strange my family should see me in terms of dollars and cents, through before i guess, they saw me in terms of problem child or an orphan of sorts.”
In his 1975 diary, he also writes of an evening spent with Paul and Linda. Boring all they talk about is how, well they are. Really overbearing, self-satisfied and dumb. His jealousy was such that in 1976, Lennon refused to attend a showing of the film the buddy holly story, as McCartney owned the rights to the holly’s music. It was sibling rivalry, explains Giuliano. And the other two Beatles weren’t a threat to him, but Paul was good. Most people grow out of sibling rivalry, but did john ever grow up as an artist or as a person? He sat in his bedroom, smoking pot and listening to music until he was 40.
Immature he may have been, but Lennon did hope that he would grow out of his sex addiction. A he said he hoped he wouldn’t be 79 and dribbling on about sex as he was at 39. His addiction found expression in over the top sex. Ono serviced him as long as she could she once said that in japan, after the age of 40, upper-class men are allowed to take a concubine.
Over the years, and dogged by death threats, Lennon became increasingly paranoid, erupting at the smallest things and seeing danger everywhere. On the night he was shot dead by mark chapman, the crazed fan to whom earlier in the day Lennon had given his autograph, Lennon had traveled home without his bodyguard for the first time in weeks. A he’d said, first they kill the bodyguard, then they kill you. If it happens it happens, says Giuliano, who believes Lennon had premonitions of his death.
Chapman, who is said to have been a model prisoner, has been granted his first parole hearing, set for the next month. His earliest possible release date in December 4, four days before the 20th anniversary of the murder.
Giuliano, 47, calls himself a recovering Beatleholic and says that his book goes to the heart of the Lennon enigma. A chapman said he didn’t shoot Lennon, he shot an ideal, says Giuliano. A john died for our myths. We all bought into this idea that he was a deity, but he was simply a product of the church of England and of Liverpool. It was John’s vulnerability and angst, as seen in the book, that made him who he was.???
Moira Petty / The London Times, 2 SectionSeptember 29, 2000
???A bit like Albert Goldman???s “the lives of John Lennon” through a soft-focus lens, this book looks at the artist’s life during the 1970s, examining his paranoia and exposing myths about the nature of his character. Giuliano, renowned for his biographical work on the Beatles, is clearly sympathetic toward the a smart Beatle and to paraphrase a song by the subject, simply wants to a give us some truth. Beatle fanatics will be fascinated by the minutiae within, including the truth behind a political prisoner John Sinclair and the details of Apple’s dissolution. In fact, the book occupies itself with everything from Lennon’s masturbatory habits to his recurring religious awakenings. Non-fans may be put off by this image of Lennon as a cad drug addict, and paranoiac; this account is for voyeurs and fans with deconstructive tendencies and is one of the best, most detailed books available on this subject.???
Colin Carson, Library JournalJuly 15, 2000
???He said the disturbing image of Lennon in his book was accurate and that the messianic love-and-peace image fans have of the former Beatle was a lie.
According to Giuliano, Lennon was obsessed with Yoko’s younger sister Setsuko and Paul McCartney’s sister Ruth. He also lusted after Linda McCartney, the author claimed. ???
Birmingham Evening MailApril 19, 2000
???In his book Lennon in America, Geoffrey Giuliano, author of several Beatles-related books, recounts the last nine years of his subject’s life. In exhaustive detail, using information purportedly gleaned from an unpublished Lennon diary (a text never directly quoted from), Giuliano reveals the not-so-shocking news that Lennon was not an altogether happy man. In other words, we get more of the character assassination that was begun in such high style by Albert Goldman’s notorious The Lives of John Lennon.
More than many other figures of his stature, Lennon lived his life in public. That he spent his last years in a frankly codependent relationship with a controlling woman (and descended into drunken and drug-fueled confusion during their brief split), supported ineffectual and trendy political causes, was capable of making disturbingly inferior music and then dropped out of music entirely for five years when only in his mid-thirties, is old news. Anyone with the barest knowledge of any of this understands that Lennon was struggling to find peace of mind during his stay in our country.???
The Daily Telegraph, Sydney AustraliaJune 17, 2004

“The evil legacy of John Lennon”

The most famous and influential member of the famous and influential Beatles is the late John Lennon.
Lennon???s mother and father (Fred) had gotten married without her parent???s approval, and Fred left his little family to join the merchant marines when John was very small. John???s mother later lived with another man and had two daughters, though she never divorced Fred. In later life Lennon expressed great hatred for his mother. His father???s second wife, Pauline, testified that the mere mention of her name ???triggered a vicious verbal attack on [his mother], whom he reviled in the most obscene language I had ever heard…??? (Giuliano, Lennon in America, p. 17). John was raised largely by his mother???s sister, his Aunt Mimi. She sent him to an Anglican Sunday school, where he sang in the choir. By age 11, though, he was permanently barred from Sunday services because he ???repeatedly improvised obscene and impious lyrics to the hymns??? (Rock Lives, p. 114). Lennon testified that none of his church experiences touched him and that by age 19 he ???was cynical about religion and never even considered the goings-on in Christianity.??? It is sad that all Lennon experienced was corrupt Christianity in the form of dead Anglicanism. By 1964, McCartney testified that none of them believed in God and that religion ???doesn???t fit into my life.??? Their drug experiences changed that, but the ???god??? they came to believe in was not the God of the Bible. Lennon said, ???We???re all God.???
By the late 1950’s, Lennon was a profane and brawling street youth. He shoplifted, abused girls, drew obscene pictures, lied ???about everything,??? despised authority, and was the ringleader of a group of rowdies. The young Lennon was also very cruel. He tried to frighten old people and made fun of those who were crippled or deformed. The new music called rock & roll fit his licentious lifestyle. Later Lennon described himself as ???a weird, psychotic kid covering up my insecurity with a macho façade??? (Giuliano, Lennon in America, p. 2).
The Beatles were powerfully influenced by American bluesmen and by Elvis Presley, and they formed a rock band called the Quarrymen in the mid-1950s. Lennon testified that ???nothing really effected me until Elvis.??? McCartney said: ???[Elvis] was the biggest kick. Every time I felt low I just put on an Elvis and I???d feel great, beautiful.??? Ringo said, ???Elvis changed my life.??? By late 1957, the band included Lennon, Harrison, and McCartney, plus other young men on bass and drums. They combed their hair and dressed like Elvis and played rhythm & blues and Chuck Berry/Little Richard/Elvis type music. The group changed its name to the Silver Beetles in 1960, then simply to the Beatles. ???John Lennon changed the name to Beatles to accent the drive of their music, the BEAT??? (H.T. Spence, Confronting Contemporary Christian Music, p. 78). Drummer Ringo Starr joined the group in 1962 just before they recorded their first single.
The Beatles set the tone for rock music and for the hippie youth culture in the 1960s until the band broke up in 1969. They led a generation of rebellious youth from marijuana to acid to ???free sex??? to eastern religion to revolution and liberal political/social activism. David Noebel observes: ???The Beatles set trends, and their fans followed their lead. They were the vanguard of an entire generation who grew long hair, smoked grass, snorted coke, dropped acid, and lived for rock ???n??? roll. They were the ???cool??? generation??? (David Noebel, The Legacy of John Lennon, p. 43).
LENNON???S IMMORALITY. Lennon???s 21st birthday party was ???a huge drunken noisy orgy??? (Davies, The Beatles, p. 177). Lennon called marriage a stupid scene??? and a mere ???bit of paper.??? He frequented prostitutes even in his teenage years, living in immorality before he was married, and then in adulterous relationships during his two marriages. His first wife, Cynthia, was pregnant with a child when he finally married her in a clandestine ceremony in August 1962. No parents attended and the other band members dressed in black. On their wedding night, John hurried away for a performance. Lennon and Yoko Ono lived together for a year while he was still married to Cynthia and Ono was still married to an American filmmaker. When Cynthia returned from a vacation in Greece, she found Ono living with her husband in her own home. Ono was still married to another man when she announced that she was expecting a baby by Lennon. The mocking Two Virgins album cover featured the nude photos of Lennon and Ono on the front and back. (The album, which had no songs, was composed of sound effects and random voices.) Ono had been married several times and had a number of abortions before her alliance with Lennon. Lennon said, ???…intellectually, we knew marriage was a stupid scene, but we???re romantic and square as well as hip and aware. We lived together for a year before we got married, but we were still tied to other people by a bit of paper??? (Davies, The Beatles). The two finally got married in March 1969. Ono wore a short mini-skirt and sunglasses. On their honeymoon, Lennon and Ono spent seven days in a public bed in Amsterdam, ???to protest violence.??? Later Lennon spent 18 months with his and Yoko???s secretary, May Pang, while he was still married to Ono. Lennon was involved with an adulterous relationship with the wife of the Beatles??? manager, Malcolm Evans (Giuliano, p. 107). In his last year, he was addicted to pornography movies and other vile things.
The Beatles manager, Brian Epstein, was a homosexual. After hearing the Beatles in a London pub, he become obsessed with making John Lennon his lover. Two years after the Beatles??? wildly successful 1964 America tour, Lennon accompanied Epstein to Barcelona, Spain, for a weekend that possibly included homosexual activity (Hunter Davies, The Beatles, introduction to the 1985 edition). There were probably other homosexual episodes in Lennon???s life. Biographer Geoffrey Giuliano, who had access to Lennon???s diaries, concluded that there was ???a pronounced homosexual element in Lennon???s makeup??? (Giuliano, Lennon in America, p. 13).
LENNON AND DRUGS. The Beatles began taking drugs during their earliest band days before they became popular. They started by taking slimming pills to stay awake during long performances. They were high on ???prellies,??? a form of speed called Phenmetrazine and marketed as Preludin. John Lennon was so out of control one night, that ???when a customer over-enthusiastically approached the stage, he kicked him in the head twice, then grabbed a steak knife from a table and threw it at the man??? (Harry Shapiro, Waiting for the Man, p. 107).
Many of the Beatles songs were about drugs. In fact, their 1967 Sgt. Pepper???s album heralded the drug revolution in America (???Approbation on Drug Usage in Rock and Roll Music,??? U.N. Bulletin on Narcotics, Oct.-Dec. 1969, p. 35; David Noebel, The Legacy of John Lennon, pp. 56,58).
Lennon admitted that he began taking LSD in 1964 and that ???it went on for years. I must have had a thousand trips … a thousand. I used to just eat it all the time??? (Rolling Stone, Jan. 7, 1971, p. 39; cited by Jann Wenner, Lennon Remembers, p. 76). John Lennon read Timothy Leary???s book The Psychedelic Experience in 1966, after Paul McCartney took him to the Indica, a hip New Age bookshop in London. Lennon wrote ???Tomorrow Never Knows??? after taking LSD and wrote the songs ???Come Together??? and ???Give Peace a Chance??? for Leary.
Lennon claimed that he had been on pills since he was 17 and soon after turned to pot. He said: ???I have always needed a drug to survive. The others, too, but I always had more, more pills, more of everything because I am more crazy, probably (Noebel, The Marxist Minstrels, p. 111). Lennon admitted to a Rolling Stone interviewer that there were ???a lot of obvious LSD things in the music.??? Lennon said, ???God isn???t in a pill, but LSD explained the mystery of life. It was a religious experience.??? In an interview with Playboy in 1981, Lennon said the Beatles smoked marijuana for breakfast and were so stoned that they were ???just all glazed eyes.??? The Beatles took out a full-page ad in the London Times (June 1967), calling for the legalization of marijuana. In 1969, Lennon said: ???If people can???t face up to the fact of other people being naked or smoking pot … then we???re never going to get anywhere??? (Penthouse, Oct. 1969, p. 29, cited in The Legacy of John Lennon, p. 66). Paul McCartney told Life magazine that he was ???deeply committed to the possibilities of LSD as a universal cure-all.??? He went on to say, ???After I took it, it opened my eyes. We only use one-tenth of our brain. Just think what all we could accomplish if we could only tap that hidden part. It would mean a whole new world. If politicians would use LSD, there would be no more war, poverty or famine??? (Life, June 16, 1967, p. 105).
In 1968, John Lennon and Yoko Ono were arrested for marijuana possession. The drug conviction nearly cost Lennon the right to live in the United States.
LENNON AND REVOLUTION. The Beatles promoted the revolutionary overthrow of authority and communism in songs such as ???Revolution No. 9,??? ???Working Class Hero,??? Back in the USSR,??? ???Power to the People,??? ???Sometime in New York City,??? ???Give Peace a Chance,??? ???Bloody Sunday??? (which called British police ???Anglo pigs???), ???Attica State??? (???now???s the time for revolution???), ???Angela??? (which glorified communist Angela Davis), and ???Piggies.??? Lennon performed at anti-America rallies and called upon America to leave Vietnam to the communists. He said: ???I really thought that love would save us. But now I???m wearing a Chairman Mao badge, that???s where it???s at. I???m just beginning to think he???s doing a good job??? (Lennon, cited by Wenner, Lennon Remembers, p. 86). Lennon gave the violent Students for Democratic Society (SDS) $5,000, hoping it would assist those who were being sought by police for bombings. Though Lennon later characterized his radicalism as ???phony??? and motivated by guilt for his wealth (Newsweek, Sept. 29, 1980, p. 77), ???its effect was deadly real??? (Noebel, p. 78).
LENNON AND PAGAN RELIGION. In the summer of 1967, the four Beatles and other rock stars, including Brian Jones and Mike Jagger of the Rolling Stones, visited Guru Maharishi Mahesh Yogi during his trip to North Wales and listened to the teachings that he called the ???Spiritual Regeneration Movement.??? This false teacher claimed to have a path of regeneration other than that of being born again through faith in Jesus Christ. Later the Beatles, along with Donovan, Mia Farrow, Beach Boy Mike Love, and others, visited the Maharishi???s ashram on the banks of the River Ganges in India to study Transcendental Meditation. The Beatles soon split with the Maharishi. But though he rejected the Maharishi, Lennon continued to believe in yoga till the end of this life. ???If John???s energy level and ambition were running high, a half hour or more of yoga was next on the agenda. . . . Outside of walking, yoga was the only exercise he ever did. But spiritual rather than physical reasons motivated him to continue meditating. . . . [He believed yoga could help him achieve his greatest ambition, which was] a state of spiritual perfection by following The Way of The Masters: Jesus, Buddha, Mohammed, Krishna and Gandhi. . . . John believed that if he meditated long and hard enough, he???d merge with God and acquire psychic powers, like clairvoyance and the ability to fly through the air. And he wanted those powers as badly as he wanted anything??? (Rosen, Nowhere Man, p. 18).
The song ???Tomorrow Never Knows??? was inspired by John Lennon???s ???drug-addled readings of the Tibetan Book of the Dead??? (Stairway to Heaven, p. 140). The lyrics say: ???Turn off your mind relax and float downstream. It is not dying. It is not dying. Lay down all thoughts, surrender to the void. It is shining. It is shining. That you may see the meaning of within. It is being. It is being.??? As we shall see, John Lennon and Yoko Ono were heavily involved in occultism toward the end of Lennon???s life.
Lennon ???was strongly influenced by Van Gogh and Marcel Duchamp [depraved artists and philosophers who taught that life is meaningless]; these men were the textbook teachers of Lennon when he attended the Liverpool Art School. Both he and Yoko Ono were much involved in avant-garde art, and their music certainly reveals this fact??? (H.T. Spence, Confronting Contemporary Christian Music, p. 41). In 1965 Lennon was asked, ???What will you do when Beatlemania subsides???? He replied: ???I don???t suppose I think much about the future. I don???t really [care]. Though now we???ve made it, it would be a pity to get bombed. It???s selfish, but I don???t care too much about humanity—I???m an escapist. Everybody???s always drumming on about the future but I???m not letting it interfere with my laughs, if you see what I mean??? (Stairway to Heaven, p. 128).
Lennon and Yoko Ono were fascinated by the occult. He purchased entire sections of occult literature in bookstores (Hellhounds on Their Trail, p. 181). Occultist John Green was hired by Yoko Ono in 1974 to be her tarot card reader. ???As time went on he became Lennon???s advisor, confidant and friend. Until October of 1980, he worked closely with them. They did everything according to ???the cards.??? He advised them on all of their business transactions and investments, even to the point of how to handle the problems Lennon was having with Apple, the Beatles record company??? (Song Magazine, Feb. 1984, p. 16, cited by More Rock, Country & Backward Masking Unmasked, p. 105). ???People were hired and fired based on the findings of the tarot card reader, Charlie Swan; the Council of Seers, an assortment of freelance astrologers, psychics and directionalists; and Yoko???s own consultations with the zodiac and Book of Numbers??? (Rosen, Nowhere Man, p. 38). Yoko followed the Asian philosophy of katu-tugai, which combined numerology with cartography. According to the tenets of katu-tugai, traveling in a westerly direction ensures good luck. In 1977, Yoko spent a week in South America studying magic with a seven-foot-tall Columbian witch, who was paid $60,000 to teach Yoko how to cast spells. ???The Lennons saw magic as both an instrument of crisis management and the ideal weapon??? (Rosen, p. 62). They cast magic spells against their opponents in lawsuits (Giuliano, p. 119) and even against Paul and Linda McCartney when they simply wanted to visit the Lennons in 1980 (p. 208). Lennon also believed in UFOs, and he religiously read the tabloid reports on these. He claimed to have seen a UFO hovering over the East River in 1974, and his song ???Nobody Told Me,??? which appeared on his Milk and Honey album, was about UFOs over New York. Lennon was fascinated with a book called The Lost Spear of Destiny, which was about the spear used to pierce the side of Jesus Christ when He was on the cross. Lennon fantasized about finding the spear. When asked what he would do with it if he found it, Lennon replied that he could do anything in the universe (Giuliano, Lennon in America, p. 81). Lennon and Yoko participated in séances, and Yoko believed that she was a reincarnation of a 3,000-year-old Persian mummy that she had purchased in from Switzerland (Giuliano, p. 157). She collected Egyptian artifacts, believing they possessed magical powers.
Yoko Ono believed the Hindu myth that a son born on his father???s birthday inherits his soul when the father dies. Thus, they arranged to have their son, Sean, delivered by cesarean on Lennon???s 35th birthday, October 9, 1975 (Hellhounds on Their Trail, p. 183). She ???was convinced the baby would be a messiah who would one day change the world??? (Giuliano, p. 101).
Lennon and Yoko???s prognosticators frequently gave false predictions. When Yoko was pregnant, I Ching predicted the baby was a girl; but it was actually a boy (Giuliano, p. 88). In 1976, Yoko???s psychic advisers suggested that Lennon should not resume his musical career until 1982, but he died two years before then (Giuliano, p. 108). A psychic Yoko consulted in 1977 in Rome predicted that Lennon would become musically productive again in 1980 and that this phase would last two years, but Lennon died in 1980 (Giuliano, p. 144). In 1979, only a year before Lennon???s death, Yoko???s advisers forecast that she and John would have two more children (Giuliano, p. 192).
LENNON???S VIOLENCE AND LACK OF LOVE. The man who sang about love (???all you need is love???) and peace (???give peace a chance???) was actually very noncompassionate, self-centered to the extreme, and violent. His biographers speak of ???the infamous Lennon temper.??? He frequently flew into rages, screaming, smashing things, hitting people. He admitted, ???I was a hitter. I couldn???t express myself and I hit. I fought men and I beat women??? (Giuliano, Lennon in America, p. 20). On one adulterous weekend fling with his secretary, May Pang, Lennon ???accused her of cheating on him, and flew into a rage, trashing the room and trampling her eyeglasses??? (Giuliano, p. 16). Lennon admitted: ???I was a very jealous, possessive guy. A very insecure male. A guy who wants to put his woman in a little box and only bring her out when he feels like playing with her??? (Ibid.). When the owner of a nightclub said something that upset Lennon, he ???beat the poor man mercilessly??? (Giuliano, p. 8). At a party in California in 1973, Lennon ???went berserk, hurling a chair out the window, smashing mirrors, heaving a TV against the wall, and screaming nonsense about film director Roman Polanski being to blame??? (Giuliano, p. 57). During the recording of his Rock ???n??? Roll album, Lennon ???was so out of control he began to kick the windows out of the car and later trashed the house??? (Giuliano, p. 59). Lennon confided to a friend, ???I???ve always wondered what it would be like to kill a woman, many women! It was only becoming a Beatle that saved me from actually doing it??? (Giuliano, p. 20). When Yoko was pregnant with their son (Sean Ono Taro Lennon), John Lennon once kicked her in the stomach during an explosive confrontation; Lennon later hit the young Sean, even kicking him once in a restaurant (Giuliano, pp. 111, 138). In 1979, Lennon flew into a rage and trashed his apartment while ???filling the air with a stream of profane invective??? (Giuliano, p. 179). As for love, even Lennon???s celebrated relationship with Yoko Ono was filled with everything but love. After 1971, ???John and Yoko???s great love was pretty much a public charade designed to help prop up their often flickering careers??? (Giuliano, p. 147). In 1972, the Sunday Mirror described John Lennon and Yoko Ono as ???one of the saddest, loneliest couples in the world . . . two people who have everything that adds up to nothing.??? On their 10th wedding anniversary in 1979, Lennon thought Yoko was mocking him when she gave him a sentimental little poem referring to him as the ruler of their kingdom, and he flew into a selfish rage when she gave him an expensive pearl-and-diamond ring, claiming that ???she never got him what he really wanted.??? After that, Lennon retreated to his room and fell into a narcotic-induced slumber. After Lennon???s death, his son Julian (the son by his first wife) perceptively asked: ???How can you talk about peace and love and have a family in bits and pieces, no communication, adultery, divorce???? (Giuliano, p. 220).
LENNON???S NEAR INSANITY. There were many evidences of insanity during Lennon???s final years. In the early 1970s, Lennon and Yoko underwent psychological therapy at the Primal Institute in California. Dr. Janov testified: ???John was simply not functioning. He really needed help??? (Giuliano, p. 18). The therapy consisted of giving oneself over to hysterical outbursts in an attempt to purge the psyche. Lennon would scream and wail, weep, and roll on the floor. ???John eventually confessed to several dark sexual impulses: he wanted to be spanked or whipped and he was drawn to the notion of having a spiked boot heel driven into him. . . . Later in his life, John gathered together a collection of S&M-inspired manikins, which he kept tucked away in the bowels of the Dakota. These dummies, adorned with whips and chains, also had their hands and feet manacled. John???s violent sexual impulses troubled Yoko??? (Giuliano, Lennon in America, p. 19). Lennon was plagued by nightmares from which he awoke in terror (Giuliano, pp. 83, 137, 142). Though never really overweight, Lennon was obsessed with his weight and when he found himself overeating, he would hide in the master bedroom and force himself to vomit (Giuliano, p. 92). After the couple moved into the Dakota apartments in New York in 1973, Lennon spent most of the time locked indoors. He referred to himself as Greta Hughes, referring to Greta Garbo and Howard Hughes, famous recluses. ???More and more, the increasingly reclusive Lennon began to shun his friends. . . . Lennon???s anxieties were rapidly getting the better of him. . . . Everybody???s working-class hero was sliding steadily into a morass of hopelessness and solemnity??? (Giuliano, pp. 84, 97, 105). He ???quietly slipped into a dark hibernation,??? spending entire days in bed (Giuliano, p. 129). To help him conquer his $700 per day heroin habit, Yoko introduced him to a form of therapy involving self-hypnosis and ???past-life regression.??? He thought he was actually traveling back into his past lives. In one session he discovered that he had been a Neanderthal man. In another, he was involved in the Crusades during the Dark Ages. Lennon was so paranoid that when he visited Hong Kong in 1976, he did not leave his suite for three days. He thought he had multiple personalities, and he would lie down and imagine that his various personalities were in other parts of the room talking to him. ???In doing so, Lennon was in such a state of mind that the slightest noise or shadow would terrify him??? (Giuliano, p. 122). When he went out into the crowds he would hear ???a cacophony of terrible voices in his head??? which filled him with terror. When he returned to New York, he became a virtual hermit, ???retreating to his room, sleeping his days away, mindlessly standing at the window watching the rain. Once Yoko found him staring off into space groaning that there was no place he could go where he didn???t feel abandoned and isolated…??? (Giuliano, p. 142). In 1978, Lennon ???locked himself into his pristine, white-bricked, white-carpeted Dakota bedroom. Lying on the bed, he chain-smoked Gitane cigarettes and stared blankly at his giant television, while the muted phone at his side was lit by calls he never took. . . . he stayed in a dark room with the curtains drawn…??? (Giuliano, pp. 173, 174). By 1979, at age 39, ???John Lennon was already an old man haunted by his past and frightened by the future??? (Giuliano, p. 177). He swung radically ???from snappy impatience to bouts of uncontrolled weeping??? and could only sleep with the aid of narcotics. Yoko talked Lennon into visiting their Virginia farm in 1979, but he became so paranoid and shaken from the brief excursion into the public (they rode a train) that when they arrived back at their home in New York he ???erupted violently, reducing the apartment to a shambles.??? The man who is acclaimed as the towering genius behind the Beatles had ???all but lost his creative drive and confessed he???d sunk so low he had even become terrified of composing??? (Giuliano, p. 130).
LENNON???S ANTI-CHRIST BLASPHEMY. Their press officer, Derek Taylor, testified: ???They???re [the Beatles] completely anti-Christ. I mean, I am anti-Christ as well, but they???re so anti-Christ they shock me which isn???t an easy thing??? (Saturday Evening Post, August 8-15, 1964, p. 25). We have seen that by age 11, John Lennon was permanently barred from Sunday services in his aunt???s Anglican church because he ???repeatedly improvised obscene and impious lyrics to the hymns.??? He did things even cruder and viler than that, such as urinate on members of the ???clergy??? from second floor windows and display homemade dummies of Christ in lewd poses. In 1966, Lennon created a furor by claiming: ???Christianity will go, it will vanish and shrink. I needn???t argue about that. I???m right and will be proved right. … We???re more popular than Jesus now??? (Newsweek, March 21, 1966). Though he claimed that he was misunderstood and gave a half-hearted apology (after learning that his remarks might financially jeopardize their United States tour), it is obvious what the head Beatle thought about Christianity. In his 1965 book A Spaniard in the Works, which was published by Simon and Schuster, Lennon portrayed Jesus Christ as Jesus El Pifico, a ???garlic eating, stinking little yellow, greasy fascist bastard Catholic Spaniard.??? In this wicked book, Lennon blasphemed the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit by calling them ???Fahter, Sock, and Mickey Most.???
Lennon???s 1970 album, Plastic Ono Band, contained two anti-christ songs. On ???I Found Out,??? Lennon sang, ???I told you before, stay away from my door. Don???t give me that brother, brother, brother, brother. . . . There ain???t no Jesus gonna come from the sky.??? In the song ???God,??? Lennon boldly said, ???I don’t believe in magic. I don’t believe in Bible. I don’t believe in tarot. I don’t believe in Jesus. I just believe in me. Yoko and me. That???s reality.???
George Harrison financed Monty Python???s vile and blasphemous Life of Brian, which even Newsweek magazine described as ???irreverent.??? Time magazine called it an ???intense assault on religion??? (Time, Sept. 17, 1979, p. 101).
Paul McCartney described himself and the other Beatles as ???four iconoclastic, brass-hard, post-Christian, pragmatic realists??? (Time, Sept. 5, 1968, p. 60).
Aliester Crowley???s photo appeared on the Beatles??? Sargent Pepper???s album cover. The Beatles testified that the characters who appeared on the album were their ???heroes.??? John Lennon explained to Playboy magazine that ???the whole Beatles idea was to do what you want … do what thou wilst, as long as it doesn???t hurt somebody??? (Lennon, cited by David Sheff, The Playboy Interviews with John Lennon and Yoko Ono, p. 61). This was precisely what Crowley taught.
Lennon claimed that the Beatles knew exactly what they wanted to do. ???We know what we are because we know what we???re doing. … There were very few things that happened to the Beatles that weren???t really well thought out by us whether to do it or not??? (Rolling Stone, Feb. 12, 1976, p. 92).
LENNON???S BRIEF FLIRTATION WITH CHRISTIANITY. In 1977, Lennon made a short-lived profession of faith in Christ while watching television evangelists. (This information was published recently in two different books—Robert Rosen, Nowhere Man: The Final Days of John Lennon and Geoffrey Giuliano, Lennon in America). Lennon began to use expressions like ???Praise the Lord??? and ???Thank you, Jesus???; attended some church services; wrote a never-released song titled ???You Saved My Soul???; took his son, Sean, to a Christian theater performance; called The 700 Club help line to request prayer for his troubled marriage; and tried to get Yoko Ono interested in Christianity. (Her first husband, Anthony Cox, had become a Christian in the 1970s, but she wanted nothing to do with it.) Even though he briefly professed faith in Christ, Lennon did not turn from his occultism. He continued to perform magical rites, consult the horoscope and prognosticators, and celebrate Buddha???s birthday (Giuliano, p. 133). Lennon???s Christian profession lasted only a few weeks. When two missionaries confronted Lennon with fundamental doctrines of the Bible such as the deity of Christ and a literal and fall, he rejected these (Giuliano, p. 134). In 1979 Lennon wrote a song titled ???Serve Yourself,??? in which he instructed his listeners: ???You got to serve yourself/ Nobody gonna do it for you/ You may believe in devils/ You may believe in laws/ But you know you???re gonna have to serve yourself.??? In interviews in December 1980, just before his death, he described his beliefs as ???Zen Christian, Zen pagan, Zen Marxist??? or nothing at all (Steve Turner, ???The Ballad of John and Jesus,??? Christianity Today, June 12, 2000, p. 86). He testified that he had never met a Christian who wasn???t actually a sanctimonious hypocrite (Giuliano, p. 134). Lennon also said that he did not believe in the Judeo-Christian doctrine that God ???is some other thing outside of ourselves??? (Spin, February 1987, p. 46). Thus to the very end of his short life Lennon continued to lead his followers into eternal destruction.
LENNON???S DEATH. Lennon was shot to death in December 1980 outside his apartment building in New York City. He was 40 years old. In an interview with Gannett News Service, Lennon???s murderer, Mark David Chapman, testified of how he prepared for the crime: ???Alone in my apartment back in Honolulu, I would strip naked and put on Beatles records and pray to Satan to give me the strength. … I prayed for demons to enter my body to give me the power to kill??? (cited by Evangelist Richard Ciarrocca, Observations, Dec. 1990). Chapman had also imitated Lennon, even taking his name for awhile, and marrying a Japanese woman.
Just hours before he was killed, Lennon had posed naked in a photo that was published on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.
At the beginning of the Beatles song ???Come Together,??? Lennon mutters, ???Shoot me.??? One of the Beatles songs was ???Happiness Is a Warm Gun.??? The lyrics are: ???When I hold you in my arms (Oh, yeah)/ And I feel my finger on your trigger (Oh, yeah)/ I know nobody can do me no harm (Oh, yeah)/ Because happiness is a warm gun, bang, bang, shoot, shoot.??? Since Lennon???s death, Yoko Ono has attempted to contact him beyond the veil of death. The cover to her album It???s Alright shows Yoko and her son, Sean, standing in a park with a spirit form of Lennon standing next to them. Lennon???s other son, Julian (his only child by his first wife, Cynthia), claims in his song ???Well, I Don???t Know??? that he has communicated with his dead father (Muncy, The Role of Rock, p. 364).
When Lennon died, his estate was estimated to be worth $275 million.
In summarizing the influence of John Lennon, rock researcher David A. Noebel stated: ???The present rock ???n??? roll scene, Lennon???s legacy, is one giant, multi-media portrait of degradation—a sleazy world of immorality, venereal disease, anarchy, nihilism, cocaine, heroin, marijuana, death, Satanism, perversion, and orgies??? (Noebel, The Legacy of John Lennon, 1982, p. 15).
Lennon released his hugely popular song ???Imagine??? in 1971. He described it as ???an anti-religious, anti-nationalistic, anti-conventional, anti-capitalistic song.??? Note the blasphemous words.
???Imagine there???s no heaven, it???s easy if you try/ No hell below us, above only sky/ Imagine all the people living for today. Imagine there???s no countries; it isn???t hard to do/ Nothing to kill or die for, and no religion too/ Imagine all the people living in peace. Imagine no possessions; I wonder if you can/ No need for greed or hunger, a brotherhood of man/ Imagine all the people sharing all the world. Chorus. ???You may say that I???m a dreamer, but I???m not the only one/ And some day I hope you???ll join us/ And the world will be as one??? (???Imagine,??? John Lennon).
After Lennon was murdered, a memorial to him was set up in Central Park across from his apartment. Inscribed in the heart of the memorial is the word ???Imagine.??? When a crowd gathers every year to observe the anniversary of Lennon???s death, they sing this anti-Christ song.
Phycology Today

GLASS ONION
THE BEATLES IN THEIR OWN WORDS EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS WITH JOHN, PAUL, GEORGE, RINGO
AND THEIR INNER CIRCLE
???Exclusive, rare, and uncensored transcripts of the Beatles press conferences, letters, FBI memos, and interviews, in their own words with lots of photos.???
Ingram

TWO OF US / JOHN LENNON AND PAUL McCARTNEY
BEHIND THE MYTH
???This nuts-and-bolts account of the fabled John Lennon / Paul McCartney collaboration underscores two very different personalities meshed to create the Beatles sound. Lennon (clearly the author ???s favorite) was the word man, the rebel, the experimenter who did not really care how people reacted to his music; McCartney the crowd pleaser, the melody man with a gift for pleasing tunes, the traditionalist with one foot in tin pan alley. Together they made magic; separately, after the Beatles broke up in 1970, Lennon was preachy and screechy, McCartney was trite and trivial. Longtime Beatles chronicler and music biographer Giuliano doesn’t come up with any staggeringly new information in his otherwise solid examination of the day-to-day specifics involved in creating songs from early pop classics like “please please me” to such mature masterpieces as “A day in the life,” but he does extract some fab quotes about the fab four. A must for fans, and critical enough to interest even more detached followers of 1960’s pop as well.???
Wendy Smith, Amazon.com
???Obscured behind the popular music of the legendary songwriting team of John Lennon and Paul McCartney was a fierce tutumlous rivalry that spanned an entire generation. This riveting, provocative biography uncovers the meaning behind their music. 60 illustrations???
Ingram
???Giuliano???s evidence is certainly convincing. He examines – in detail the post-mortem and coroner’s reports and explores the contradictions in the evidence of witnesses.  He shows jones could not have drowned as a result of booze and drugs, and that Jones – an asthma sufferer – did not suffer a sudden attack that resulted in his death. That leaves murder, and a confession, made to Giuliano by one of the men who held jones under the water. Giuliano’s book, apart from offering convincing proof of how Jones was killed, also lays to rest rumors that the rolling stones, having edged him out of the band, had Jones murdered to stop him setting up a rival band with john Lennon or Jimi Jendrix.???
Birmingham PostJune 25, 1994
???Where previous books have treated the relationship between main Beatles John Lennon and Paul McCartney as one element in the larger story, Giuliano plucks out just the parts about John and Paul.
This includes both the musical and personal relationships between these two strong-willed gents, and it’s a lively story, with enough factoids so almost any reader will find something either new or long-forgotten.
For instance: Lennon’s first draft of “In My Life” was a list of places from his past, set to music. Recognizing a dead end when he drove into one, he made it more general and ended up with a classic.
The interesting part is that Giuliano then adds long-time Beatle pal Pete Shotton’s take on “In My Life”: that it’s a shame Lennon couldn’t sustain the beauty of the opening verse into the last verse, which Shotton thinks devolved into a bland cliche.
Standards are high when you’re a Beatle.
Giuliano paints Lennon and McCartney as alike in some ways, different in others, strong-willed enough that they were guaranteed both to complement and clash.
McCartney was stronger on melodies, insecure about his lyrics. In the early days of the band, Lennon did much of the writing. By 1966 the balance had begun to shift, and by the end McCartney was the dominant voice.
The Beatles’ formal breakup in 1970 was followed by a sporadic hot-and-cold war. McCartney says the breach was healed by the time of Lennon’s death in 1980, and that the only real point of disagreement was business matters, never music. Some Lennon biographers have not been so sure.
Giuliano seems to support the healing-hands-of-time theory. He suggests both John and Paul could be childish and that in the end, they needed each other. He suggests that underneath, they both knew it.???
David Hinckley, Daily News March 16, 1999
???’Lennon diaries’ book may enrage Beatles fans: New biography says that, at the age of 15, the late rock star had a sexual encounter with his mother and that he beat wife Yoko and their son.

WASHINGTON — In the two decades since John Lennon was shot dead on a Manhattan sidewalk, the diaries he wrote during his last years of life have stood as one of pop music’s most closely-guarded secrets. The threat of litigation has shadowed anyone who wanted to quote the diaries in print, and a former employee of Lennon’s was once prosecuted and found guilty of grand larceny for stealing them.

That history, however, doesn’t daunt Geoffrey Giuliano. In the coming weeks, the celebrity biographer plans to release Lennon in America, a highly-critical, luridly-detailed account of the ex- Beatle’s life from 1971 to 1980.
The book, Giuliano says, is based on years of research and interviews; but what’s most eye-catching about this 270-page tome is right in its subtitle: Based in Part on the Lost Lennon Diaries.

With an initial print run of 50,000 planned by Cooper Square Press, Lennon in America seems designed to infuriate Beatles fans. Among its many startling assertions: That at 15 he had a sexual encounter with his mother; that he was a sexual obsessive who fantasized about Barbara Walters; that he was briefly a born-again Christian and an ardent fan of evangelist Pat Robertson’s 700 Club television show; that he was so intent on slimming that he was bulimic; that he beat both his wife, Yoko Ono, and their son, Sean.

Giuliano, 46, who has written more than 19 books and runs a vegetarian food bank on an animal sanctuary in Upstate New York, stands by his account. But he refuses to be pinned down on some key specifics. He won’t say whether he still has a copy of the diaries, for example, nor will he say exactly what information he culled from them. Further, the man he says handed him a photocopy of the diaries — Lennon drinking buddy Harry Nilsson — died in 1994. So can anyone corroborate that this purported handoff even took place????
The Vancouver Sun April 19, 2000


PAINT IT BLACK / THE MURDER OF BRIAN JONES
???Giuliano???s evidence is certainly convincing. He examines – in detail the post-mortem and coroner’s reports and explores the contradictions in the evidence of witnesses.  He shows jones could not have drowned as a result of booze and drugs, and that Jones – an asthma sufferer – did not suffer a sudden attack that resulted in his death. That leaves murder, and a confession, made to Giuliano by one of the men who held jones under the water. Giuliano’s book, apart from offering convincing proof of how Jones was killed, also lays to rest rumors that the rolling stones, having edged him out of the band, had Jones murdered to stop him setting up a rival band with john Lennon or Jimi Jendrix.???
Birmingham PostJune 25, 1994
???There’s no denying it, ???Paint It Black??? is a thorough and absorbing read.???
Southern CrossJune 1, 1994
???Pop author Giuliano’s well-written account spins a sinister tale.???
Cheltenham NewsJune, 1994
???Giuliano weaves together the conflicting evidence to prove conclusively that jones was murdered. Two-thirds biography and one third thriller, Giuliano sketches an evocative picture of the ‘swinging sixties’.???
Brian BoydJune, 1994
???Giuliano has an impressive interviewing technique which absorbs the most from the evidence his witnesse???s give him. He is very readable and the book is both compelling and compulsive.???
Bolton Evening NewsMay 7, 1994
???Powerful, frightening and impressive one would hope that in view of the allegations in this book the police might finally take some action. Apart from the murder angle, the book is well-written and hard-hitting, giving a most remarkable insight not only into Jones but also the Rolling Stones and their relationships. It is also a moving biography of a young, talented musician who relied on drugs and drink and who died in the very place where the most famous children’s character in the world, Winnie-The-Pooh, was created.???
Jersey Evening PostMay 6, 1994
???Investigative reporter Giuliano wins few friends as he treads on toes. But for Giuliano it has always had a purpose: to find the truth.???
SceneApril 22, 1994
???For anyone who relishes the nuts and bolts of a murder mystery, this is a richly-detailed persuasive read which asks a lot of questions and manages to answer them.???
Manchester Evening NewsApril 23, 1994
???In an astonishing book, Giuliano names the men responsible for killing jones. His claims have been backed by top U.S. pathologist professor Cyril Wecht, files. He said: ‘I cannot rule out the possibility that one of more people may have caused his drowning.’ ???
The PeopleApril 3, 1994
???A rash of books have appeared in recent months – of which Giuliano???s is perhaps the most high-profile, suggesting that jones was murdered… The evidence is certainly convincing. He examines – and reproduces – in detail the post-mortem and coroner’s reports and explores the contradictions in the evidence of witnesses’ present at the time. He shows how jones could not have drowned as a result of taking too much booze and drugs, and that Jones – an asthma sufferer – did not suffer a sudden attack that resulted in his death. That leaves murder, and a confession, made to Giuliano by one of the men who held jones under the water, of how a prank with undertones of revenge got fatally out of hand. Giuliano’s book, apart from offering convincing proof of how Jones was killed, also lays to rest rumors that have circulated in the past 25-years, that the rolling stones, having edged him out of the band, had Jones murdered to stop him setting up a rival band with John Lennon or Jimi Hendrix. ???
Simon Evans, Birmingham PostJune 25, 1994
???Giuliano seeks to answer [the] questions [surrounding Jones’ death] in his new biography entitled Paint It Black. Most will form their own opinion after reading this book, but even if the question of who killed the sixties star does not intrigue you, there’s heaps of filthy gross on the Rolling Stones at the height of their fame. There’s no denying it, paint it black is a thorough and absorbing read.???
Choice Read, Southern CrossJune 1, 1994
???The mysterious death of Rolling Stone Brian Jones spawned this intriguing book which argues the Cheltenham-born star was murdered. Found drowned in the swimming pool at his mansion in Sussex, Brian Jones’ death is now part of sixties mythology. Pop author Geoffrey Giuliano???s well-written account tells a sinister tale of the star’s life and death in 1969.???
Matt Rodda, Cheltenham NewsJune, 1994
???Giuliano weaves together the conflicting evidence to prove conclusively that jones was murdered. Two-thirds biography and one third thriller, Giuliano sketches an evocative picture of the ‘swinging sixties’ when jones first met Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. People are ‘cats’, music venues are ‘joints’ and every sentence is suffixed by “man”. Jagger and Richards, who both came from ordinary middle-class backgrounds, thought Jones was ‘cool’ because he had two illegitimate children while still in his teens.???
Brian BoydJune, 1994
???Stones expert Giuliano now says that Jones was murdered. Giuliano reveals evidence which he claims shows that jones’ death was far from being ‘misadventure’. To back his verdict he outlines the motives and methods of the murderer and pieces together the events which surround that fateful night. His conclusion, after a convincing rundown of events, is that all the details point to jones being killed as opposed to simply dying.???
Hartlepoel MailJune, 1994
???Pop author Giuliano???s very well-written account tells a sinister tale of the star’s life and death in 1969. Jones was a complex person, far from the stereotypical bohemian rock and roll star. He went through a difficult time after leaving the stones while still depending on them for his livelihood. Giuliano tells how jones sacked Eastender Frank Thorogood, leaving him with a grudge even though he tried to let Thorogood down gently. Giuliano says Thorogood and another builder drowned Brian Jones in the swimming pool, during a bout of horse play that got out of control.???
Matt Rodda, Gloucestershire EchoMay 17, 1994
???Giuliano has an impressive interviewing technique which absorbs the most from the juices of evidence he is a witnesses give him. He is very readable and the book is both compelling and compulsive.???
Adam Moss, Bolton Evening NewsMay 7, 1994
???Giuliano’s book is powerful, frightening and impressive. One would hope that in view of the allegations in this book the police might take some action to verify the facts. Apart from the murder angle, the book is well-written and hard-hitting, giving a most remarkable insight not only into Brian Jones but also the other rolling stones and their relationships with each other. It is also a moving biography of a young and very talented musician who relied on drugs and drink and who died in the very place where the most famous children’s character in the world, Winnie-The-Pooh, was created.???
Gordon Young, Jersey Evening PostMay 6, 1994
???The book makes a convincing argument that there was, indeed, foul play. It includes a new forensic opinion that rules out drugs, booze, asthma or liver failure as the cause of death; it highlights gaping inconsistencies in the statements of the three people who claimed to be the only ones present on the night jones died; it reveals that, in fact, many more people were there. The most powerful testimony comes from a man going by the pseudonym ‘Joe’, who was one of Thorogood’s laborers. He recounts how Jones was killed by himself and another laborer, called frank, in drunken horseplay that got out of hand.???
Chris Holt, Northern EchoApril 23, 1994
???Giuliano, like the late Albert Goldman, has thrived on controversial books on famous English rock stars. In Goldman???s case it was John Lennon. Now, following his tomes on Paul McCartney which upset the fab one, and George Harrison, the author (who describes himself as a ‘tough New Yorker who gets the job done’) has switched from the Beatles to Stones. The investigative reporter wins few friends as he treads on toes. But for Giuliano it has always had a purpose: to find the truth. He believes paint it black is making the police consider reopening the files on the demise of Jones which was once considered ‘death by misadventure’ by an East Grinstead coroner’s court. Giuliano said: ‘I believe they will re-open the case and I hope Brian???s name will be cleared.???
Mike Donovan, SceneApril 22, 1994
???Giuliano???s version of events is backed by forensic evidence that jones could not have died accidentally. He was only mildly drunk, barely under the influence of drugs and would easily have been able to swim to the poolside if, for instance, he had suffered an asthma attack. For anyone who relishes the nuts and bolts of a murder mystery, this is a richly-detailed and persuasive read which asks a lot of questions and manages to answer most of them.???
Paul Taylor, Manchester Evening NewsApril 21, 1994
???In an astonishing book, Geoffrey Giuliano names the man he believes was responsible for killing Jones – builder Frank Thorogood, who had been hired to look after the star. And his claims have been backed by top U.S. pathologist professor Cyril Wecht, who has studied all the files. He said: ‘I cannot rule out the possibility that one of more people may have caused his drowning.’ Giuliano has spent three years probing the Stone’s death in July 1969. And he has found three key witnesses who he claims point to murder.???
Mark Thomas and David Jack, The PeopleApril 3, 1994

BEHIND BLUE EYES / A LIFE OF PETE TOWNSHEND
???Townshend is one of rock’s most complex figures, as Giuliano expertly conveys.???
Jeff Bradley, Sunday Denver PostDecember 22, 1996
???Giuliano’s [new book] is also a first-rate effort. The literary style of most rock journalists is just a notch above that of a sun sub-editor, so it is wonderfully refreshing to find real wit and grace in Giuliano’s writing. His sentences are sprinkled with such words as ‘bide’ and ‘lethargy’ – the sort of terms that would make Beavis and Butthead dizzy with incomprehension, best of all, Giuliano loves music, and he writes with real enthusiasm about the who’s greatest achievements, “Quadrophenia” and “Tommy.???
Books of the Year, The Daily TelegraphNovember 30, 1996
???In taking so much straight from the horse’s mouth, Giuliano is able to put a very personal spin on Townshend’s life. For instance, where Dave Marsh’s before I get old: the story of the Who frames Townshend’s famed guitar-smashing within the context of pop culture and modern art, Giuliano suggests it was sparked by the guitarist’s anger, particularly at his childhood home???
J.D. Considine, Baltimore SunNovember 24, 1996
???In this spirited chronicle, veteran rock biographer Giuliano captures nearly everything, the excesses as well as the successes. Townshend’s tumultuous life has gone through several incarnations. Giuliano documents the musician’s struggles to continue to break new creative ground after the public embraced “Tommy”, his conflicts with his bandmates and, of course, his highly publicized substance-abuse problems. But Giuliano also peels away the layers of Townshend???s public persona to find a complex, passionate man who is full of contradictions…. Giuliano, who’s known the rock star for nearly 20-years, reveals his subject hasn’t lost his bite: ‘you know what happens to the likes of Bowie, Jagger, and me?’ asks Townshend. ‘Our teenage kids turn around and say, ‘you look like mutton dressed as lamb.’ how can I possibly have my friends around?’ the kid’s still all right, and so is this penetrating look at his life! ???
Publishers WeeklyOctober 28, 1996
???This in-depth book about Townshend is a must for any pop music library. Veteran rock biographer Giuliano, whose previous subjects have been members of precisely the clique of 1960s-70s British rockers whose musical and personal self-indulgence brought on, first, punk rock and then all things alternative, gives us that book. As the Who’s guitarist-songwriter-resident genius, Townshend, has always more than slightly impressed with his and his band’s magnitude, is another one of the aforementioned clique. Giuliano provides valuable insight and commentary. He is particularly revealing on Townshend???s state of mind in the late 1970s, when several uneven albums put the Who’s creative and, more important, profit-making future in doubt: turns out Pete was boozing. The drinking, the drugs, the groupies-all are here, along with everything you want to know about Meher Baba and Pete, and lots of over- intellectualizing about rock. In other words, this is the perfect Pete Townshend bio! ???
Mike Tribby, BooklistOctober 15, 1996
???Giuliano uses his 20-year friendship with Townshend, interviews with who insiders to create an admiring but gritty and insightful account of this contradictory man. He covers Townshend???s troubled early life, his transformation from jazz guitarist to guitar-smashing rocker, his addiction and subsequent recovery, his search for meaning and discovery of guru Meher Baba, his creative output (especially the rock opera “Tommy”), the autobiographical nature of his writing, and his recent admission of bisexuality. This is a highly readable account of a popular musical genius and his demons. Recommended for all music and popular culture collections.???
Rossellen Brewer, Library JournalOctober 15, 1996
???Giuliano has collected an extraordinary number of details about Townshend???s profoundly dysfunctional childhood; his long-standing rivalry with fellow who member, vocalist Roger Daltrey; his addiction to heroin; his search for religious meaning and his (occasionally bizarre) devotion to the silent Indian mystic Meher Baba; his erratic career after the who stopped touring his charitable work; his hearing loss; and the relatively recent revelation of his bisexuality???
Jim Kobak’s, Kirkus ReviewsSeptember 15, 1996
???American actor Giuliano, a British pop fanatic with more than a dozen books to his name, has a fair stab at capturing the Townshend enigma in what is the first full biography of the who guitarist. Giuliano is a bit of a trainspotter but that simply means his book is well-researched, exploring much of Townshend???s personal life – his drink and drug battles and his enduring marriage to Karen – as well as his stormy but successful Rock’N’Roll career. It’s a matter-of-fact, Warts’n’All portrait – more man than music – but one that will have you rushing to play some of those classic who tunes!???
Shropshire Star – WellingtonAugust 17, 1996
???See me, feel me, read me! This book… Is packed full of dates, facts, a decent index, a discography, a diary of events and quotes from a mysterious who fan and ‘long-time insider’ codenamed Kathy. It [sets] out Pete???s background (both parents were musicians) and the story of the Who, chronicling in detail the endless infighting, squabbling and permanent war zone that constitutes life in one of the world’s most successful rock groups… His picture of growing up in west London in the 1960’s is not bad at all; he’s got all the right pub names, got the jargon.???
Janet Street-Porter, London Sunday TimesAugust 11, 1996
???Unlike so many fawning rock biographers who lavish false praise on a bunch of worthless morons, Giuliano has the ability to get to the heart of the man and, by doing so, gives readers a glimpse of a period in history… Fans will never get closer to the man than in behind blue eyes. Unfortunately, Giuliano does such a magnificent job, many fans may wished they never searched so hard.???
Calgary SunAugust 11, 1996
???Nobody knows what it’s like to be the bad man, to be the sad man, behind blue eyes.’ so sang Pete Townshend on the who is rock classic. Behind blue eyes attempts to let everyone else in on the secret, and a disturbing read it is, too. This first biography of rock icon Townshend depicts him as the tortured genius who inspired a generation, but who lacked self-esteem and worth. It tracks his life and career from his lonely days in a dysfunctional family to his fall, and rise, from the depths of drug and alcohol oblivion. The Who guitarist and songwriter, says Giuliano, pushed the self-destruct button despite watching his friends and contemporaries die around him. Townshend’s on-off battle back to life forms the most absorbing part of the book, taking in his conversion to the teachings of Meher Baba en-route. The friction within the Who, held by some to be responsible for their very success, is seen here for the destructive influence it really was. Giuliano refuses to pussy-foot about, detailing the numerous times Townshend and Daltrey all but came to blows, and the bitter disillusionment of both. Townshend’s financial disasters, his infidelities and insecurities are put under the microscope, too – often in his own admissions. Yet amid the mayhem and tragedy, including the untimely deaths of drummer Keith Moon and manager Kit Lambert, there are beacons of hope. There is the survival of Tommy and Quadrophenia, the writer’s 30-year marriage against amazing odds, and, of course, some memorable music.???
Paul Cole, Birmingham Evening MailAugust 9, 1996
???There is a lot of Peter Townshend about at the moment. Tommy’s on stage in London; a re-mastered Quadrophenia has just come out on CD; the Who came back, yet again, in Hyde Park last month; even the scooter seems to be making a comeback. And now a book. Not bad for a 51-year-old who is constantly reminded that he once wrote: “I hope I die before I get old.”
Pete Townshend’s childhood was made unhappy by his mother’s affairs, living with a mad grandmother, and ridicule and rejection at school – themes that would later crop up in the story of his unhappy creation, Tommy. Townshend sought – and gained – acceptance through the guitar, and at the foot of a staircase of Acton grammar school one Roger Daltrey eventually asked: “Want to join my band?”
Townshend’s tempestuous relationship with Daltrey is what keeps this book ticking. There is an enormous amount of jealous rivalry between Daltrey – working class, cocky, pretty, successful with women, and Townshend – arty and insecure. Sometimes this would boil over into violence but usually it would just come to back -stabbing and slagging each other off to the press. Both took turns in the Who’s driving seat.
For a generation which existed for breaking all the rules, the Who were a perfect outlet for suppressed aggression. Louder than anyone else, cheeks bulging with amphetamines, their instrument-smashing stage antics made up for any lack of musicianship. Their posh, Bach-loving manager, Kit Lambert, realised the power of marketing and encouraged bad behaviour. “Smash your guitar, the Daily Mail’s here. We can afford it,” he yelled to Townshend from the side.
Townshend and the Who followed the well-worn rock ‘n’ roll path through money, yachts and Berkshire mansions to drugs, bad behaviour in hotels and transatlantic flights, and in-built hate. Then came the slide out of fashion, and tragedy – the death of drummer Keith Moon, of 11 kids at a concert in Cincinnati, and of Kit Lambert.
There are two Pete Townshends. One, the creative force behind the Who, is hungry for spirituality and a keen follower of Parsi master Meher Baba. This one ages gracefully. He becomes a patron of charities, an anti-drugs crusader; he writes fiction, has tea with Ted Hughes. The other Pete Townshend tears up fivers to taunt poor friends, his stories change from one telling to another. He is acerbic and sarcastic, with an ego to match the size of his nose.
Behind Blue Eyes is mainly about the first, the good Pete Townshend. The second is more implied. Geoffrey Giuliano has researched this book with forensic attention to detail. There is little of the over-writing and cliche youd expect with rock writing and it is an honest account of an interesting man.
???
Sam Wollaston, The Guardian (London) MailJuly 16, 1996
???Committed fan Giuliano tells a good story…it’s lucky Townshend did so much TV, press and radio talking to give a fund of sources to draw on. The most fascinating part of Townshend???s 50-years, however, has to be his marriage to Karen, with its survival after 28-years. Karen’s view of her husband is the most poignant: ‘he seems lost, blinded by the past,’ she insists. ‘I don’t think the man really ever found himself.’ maybe that’s why he wrote: hope I die before I get old… ???
Alison Ferst, Middlesbrough Evening TelegraphAugust 2, 1996
???Pete Townshend is now the victim of the next step in his canonisation of pop, the celebrity biography. Surely, it should be enough to write songs that millions the world over rush out and buy and spend their lives singing badly? Yet one of the crosses that a pop star has to bear is books such as this one.
Geoffrey Giuliano is a top international celebrity biographer and popular music authority and an actor, artist, animal-rights advocate and 25-year student of Vedic culture. Giuliano met Townshend in 1976, through a mutual interest in the mystic and teacher Meher Baba. After Baba’s death, Townshend decided to set up a study centre in Twickenham, dedicated to the master. Giuliano wrote to him there and was invited over to help.
This book, like many written by Americans who study pop music the way other nations study the breeding habits of squid, is packed full of dates, facts, a decent index, a discography, a diary of events and endless quotes from a mysterious Who fan and long-time insider code named Kathy. It does a great job of setting out Pete’s background (both parents were musicians) and the story of the Who, chronicling in inordinate detail the endless infighting, squabbling and permanent war zone that constitutes life in one of the world’s most successful rock groups.???
The Sunday Times (London)August 11, 1996
???In a life of Pete Townshend Giuliano examines Townshend???s long-term fascination with the spiritual teachings of silent master Meher Baba, his untiring work for rock against racism and amnesty international and his enduring 30-year marriage. Above all Giuliano examines Pete Townshend???s unwilling elevation to his position as rock’s often contradictory, and all too human, reigning elder statesman.???
Nick Jackson , Bolton Evening NewsJuly 20, 1996
???Behind blue eyes is mainly about the good Pete Townshend. The second [Pete] is more implied. Giuliano has researched this book with forensic attention to detail. It is an honest account of an interesting man.???
Sam Wollaston, The GuardianJuly 16, 1996
???Pete Townshend gets ‘Giulianoed’!???
John Harris, Q MagazineAugust 1996
???The man who became a voice of the young when he penned such 1960s anthems as “my generation” and I can’t explain” has grown from a guitar-bashing rebel to a revered inductee (as a member of the Who) in the rock and roll hall of fame. In this spirited chronicle, veteran rock biographer Giuliano (Dark Horse the private life of George Harrison etc.) Captures nearly everything in between, the excesses as well as the successes. Townshend’s tumultuous life has gone through several incarnations. Giuliano adequately documents the musician’s struggles to continue to break new creative ground after the public embraced tommy his conflicts with his bandmates and, of course his highly publicized substance-abuse problems. But Giuliano also peels away the layers of Townshend???s public persona to find a complex, passionate man who is full of contradictions. Although Townshend has been married to the same woman most of his adult life, he has carried on numerous affairs with both men and women in the 1970s, he followed the teachings of the spiritual leader Meher Baba, which required him to abstain from alcohol and drugs, but he continued to struggle with his addictions. In tracing Townshend???s later years, Giuliano, who’s known the rock star for nearly 20 years, reveals that his subject hasn’t lost his bite: “you know what happens to the likes of Bowie, Jagger, and me?” asks Townshend. “Our teenage kids turn around and say, ‘you look like mutton dressed as lamb. How can I possibly have my friends around?’ “The kid’s still all right, and so is this penetrating look at his life.???
Publishers Weekly
???Touted as the ???world’s loudest rock band,” the Who has also been one of the most innovative and popular musical groups for more than 30 years now. The creative force behind the band has always been Townshend, who, surprisingly, has never been the subject of a full-fledged biography. Giuliano (born under a bad sign, St. Martin’s, 1994) uses his 20-year friendship with Townshend, interviews with who insiders, and previously publisher interviews to create an admiring but gritty and insightful account of this contradictory man. He covers Townshend???s troubled early life, his transformation from jazz guitarist to guitar –smashing rocker, his addiction and subsequent recovery his search for meaning and discovery of guru Meher Baba, his creative output (especially the rock opera tommy), the autobiographical nature of his writing, and his recent admission of bisexuality. Though Giuliano’s style is often florid, this is a highly readable account of a popular musical genius and his demons. Recommended for all music and popular culture collections? Roselyn brewer library journal, an in-depth book about Pete Townshend is a must for any pop music library. Veteran rock biographer Giuliano, whose previous subjects have been members of precisely the clique of 1960s-70s British rockers whose musical and personal self-indulgence brought on, first, punk rock and then all things alternative, gives us that book. As the who’s guitarist-songwriter-resident genius, Townshend, always more than slightly impressed with his and his band’s magnitude, is another one of the aforementioned clique. Giuliano shares Townshend???s high opinion of himself (in fact, the text occasionally hyperventilates with awe) but provides valuable insight and commentary, too. He is particularly revealing on Townshend???s state of mind in the late 1970s, when several uneven albums put the who’s creative and, more important, profit-making future in doubt: turns out Pete was boozing. The drinking, the drugs, the groupies—all are here, along with everything you want to know about Meher Baba and Pete, and lots of over intellectualizing about rock. In other words, this is the perfect Pete Townshend bio. ???
Kirkus Review
???Founding member and driving force behind the Who, rock ‘n’ roll Boswell of his “g-g-g-generation,” creator of tommy (and of a new form of musical excess. The ???rock opera???), and possessor of one of the most prolific appetites (even by rocker standards) for booze, drugs, and the high life, Pete Townshend has long since cemented his legend as one of the giants of contemporary rock. Beginning with the Who’s 1965 anthemia “my generation” (remembered for its defiant refrain, “hope I die before I get old”), Townshend???s career is perhaps best characterized by an uncompromising (some would say self-destructive) approach to both music and life. Giuliano (blackbird: the life and times of Paul McCartney, 1991, etc.) Has collected an extraordinary number of details about Townshend???s profoundly dysfunctional childhood; his long-standing rivalry with fellow who member, vocalist Roger Daltrey; his addiction to heroin; his search for religious meaning and his (occasionally bizarre) devotion to the silen Indian mystic Meher Baba; his erratic career after the who stopped touring his charitable work; his hearing loss; and the relatively recent revelation of his bisexuality.
The first ever biography of this controversial rock legend chronicles the amazing career, deadly addictions, and enduring presence as one of the world’s greatest popular performers.
???
Ingram

THE LOST BEATLES INTERVIEWS
???The Lost Beatles interviews a although the original Beatles drummer is represented in it, a pre-Beatles band mate of John, Paul, and George, too, this isn’t a collection of interviews with Pete Best and other lost Beatles. But has many fab four press conferences, news clippings, latter-day interviews with individual Beatles, and conversations with the group = s inner circle (Yoko Ono, producer George Martin, etc.) And families (e.g., John’s sister and his aunt Mimi, who raised him) as well as figures on Beatledom’s periphery (Donovan, Ravi Shankar, etc.). Remarkably, Giuliano has drawn up plenty of nuggets for Beatlemaniacs, ranging from backstage trivia to gossip and ax-grindings relayed by the likes of Lennon a concubine may pang and a former groupie married to one of McCartney???s wings band mates.???
Gordon Flagg, Booklist
???In this revealing book, based on interviews with Lennon, McCartney, Harrison, and Starr, as well as conversations with Madonna, Eric Clapton, Yoko Ono, Ginger Baker, Donovan, and many others who knew and worked with the fab four, the Beatles speak candidly on such previously taboo subjects as drugs, religion, mysticism, their break-up, the death of Brian Epstein, and the murder of John Lennon, never before seen photos.???
Ingram
???As nearly all faithful followers of the legacy of the fab four have come to realize over the past decade, Giuliano has ascended -through the sheer volume of his writings on the Beatles – to the position of the unofficial ‘Boswell of Beatledom’. He’s approached them, individually and as a group, in his written and taped documentation from just about every angle imaginable… But if you care to know anything, if not everything, about the Beatles, Giuliano is the source. His latest work appeared last December… As the title states, this is a collection of interviews, as well as press conference transcripts, spanning the years 1963 to 1993… Giuliano conducted many of these sessions himself (including ones with Yoko, Pete Best, Julia Baird, Mary Hopkins and Gerry Marsden)… It all amounts to a vast cross section of viewpoints about the Beatles phenomenon that no other book has heretofore managed to assemble. The book also features 32 pages of entertaining, excellent, black and white photos, some of them appearing for the first time in book form… Giuliano may be moving on now to other subjects, other discussions of pop culture heroes and their relative significance to us now (in a time when the only thing that seems to matter to anyone is how much money a person makes, or has access to.) If the Lost Beatles Interviews has, temporarily or for good, exhausted Giuliano’s store of fab lore, at least he has spent it on a work that does justice to their legend…???
Paul Gabriel, DISCoveriesJune 1995
???As is the case with Elvis Presley, there is a glut of books about the Beatles crowding the store shelves these days. Few of them are deserving of anyone’s attention… Two of the better Beatles bios, however, were written by Geoffrey Giuliano: Blackbird / the Life and Times of Paul McCartney and Dark Horse / the Private Live of George Harrison. Giuliano has turned his interest in the group into a minor industry, with at least a half-dozen titles to his credit. The Lost Beatles interviews is his latest endeavor, and a strange hodgepodge it is. Giuliano has cobbled together forgotten interviews with the Beatles and their associates from obscure sources, and the result is an oddly revealing look at four complex personalities caught up in an unimaginable swirl of fame and success. Most striking are the press conferences from their early days of endless touring and how funny the exchanges could be… George Harrison, in his Post-Beatles interviews, comes across as a crabby, preachy church lady, and is particularly nasty and combative with the press in a press conference with Madonna to publicize the film, “Shanghai surprise”. Paul McCartney, who has the rare talent of giving a seemingly candid interview without revealing a whit of himself, is surprisingly forthcoming in an interview with Julia Baird, John Lennon’s half-sister. Worth the price of the book, however, is a hilariously frank interview with John Lennon???s aunt Mimi, who raised Lennon from age three. When asked about John’s leftist political activities, Mimi replies, ‘don’t talk to me of such things! I know that boy… If there were a revolution, John would be first in the queue to run!’ ‘I usually have a large photograph of John hanging in the lounge,’ adds aunt Mimi. ‘When he’s a good boy it’ll go back up again!???
Tom Graves, Washington Post Book WorldMarch 12, 1995
???Giuliano has sifted through what must have been hundreds of hours of press conferences tapes, along with volumes of magazine and newspaper articles featuring John, Paul, George and Ringo to come up with this volume. Giuliano himself appears to have begun interviewing former Beatles sometime in the mid-1980s, and he has amassed an impressive collection of memorabilia about the band as well as old news releases and press clippings. The result is a quick read through the history of the best-documented musical group ever. Starting with the first flush of Beatlemania, moving through the troubled last days of the band and ending with decades of reflection and posturing, the book illuminates various facets of this story. Some of the material is of general interest; other tidbits are intended solely for the fanatic who has a room full of Beatles albums, singles, CDs and other items. The book begins with excerpts from thirteen press conferences that took place around the world in 1964. It’s the Beatles in their ‘cheeky lads’ phase; banal questions are given undeservedly sharp answers… The middle section of the book is devoted to interviews with the Beatles following the group’s break up, and the final pages contain interviews with people close to the band. The material from producer George Martin, for instance, is quite interesting, as are talks with Pete Best (he was kicked out of the band and is replaced by Ringo just before they hit the big time) and John’s aunt Mimi… On balance, there’s enough good material in the book to make it worthwhile. Interest in the Beatles remains high as their old BBC radio tapes have been made into a top-selling cd – and any new information about them is welcome.???
Mike Stedham, Anniston StarFebruary 5, 1995
???There are some interesting conversations to be found here… A couple of serious interviews stand out – those with producer George Martin and engineer Geoff Emerick, in which they describe the primitive technical wizardry behind the Beatles??? sound, and with John Lennon???s sister Julia.???
Book Review, Los Angeles TimesSunday, January 29, 1995
???This hodgepodge of interview and press-release transcripts is largely free of prejudice. Included are transcripts from early Beatle press conferences (in which often-recounted quotes are presented in their larger contexts), individual Beatle interviews from the late 1960s through 1991, and conversations with various Beatle associates… This [book] offers a compelling\ overview of various perspectives on the group and its continuing mystique. Recommended for popular music collections. ???
Lloyd Jansen, Library JournalDecember 1994

THE LOST JOHN LENNON INTERVIEWS
???A collection of transcripts, including the last interview John Lennon ever did. The book also features 32 pages of rare photos of Lennon taken during his days with the Beatles and with his wife, Yoko Ono.???
Jae-Ha Kim, Chicago Sun-TimesJanuary 3, 1997
???I loved Yoko Ono’s assertion that ‘if I were Hitler???s girlfriend, things would have been different. There’s also one remarkably contentious interview in which Lennon finally snaps to the reporter, ‘will you shut up for a minute!???
Stephen Whitty, San Jose Mercury NewsDecember 15, 1996
???Featuring rare, exclusive interviews with John Lennon, taken during the period when he produced some of his greatest work with the Beatles, divorced Cynthia Lennon and married Yoko Ono, and overcame a short-lived heroin addiction, the Lost Lennon Interviews offers new insight into this timeless and troubled hero. With some 200 rare photos.???
Ingram

THE ILLUSTRATED JOHN LENNON
???Accompanied by an introduction by Charlie Lennon, in which he reveals the often complicated hidden world of his nephew, this insightful look at John Lennon???s entire life neatly ties together the myth, music, and magic of the legend and serves as a treasury of seldom-before-seen pictures from Giuliano???s library.???
Ingram

THE ILLUSTRATED JIMI HENDRIX
???A uncovering the myth and magic of a celebrated, pioneering rock guitarist, a full-color dedication features scores of exclusive, never-before-published photographs and documents.???
Ingram
???Unlike other recent books that simply recycle familiar images, this volume offers new and interesting shots of Jimi Hendrix, as well as reproductions of posters, tickets, picture sleeves, and documents of various sorts… The book provides over twenty full-page photographs and scores of smaller photographs. Furthermore, the pictures (loads in color) are very well reproduced. There are some new pictures of members of the Hendrix family from Al Hendrix???s collection, and from the collection of Jimi???s aunt, Pearl Brown; the snapshot of a twelve-year-old Jimi with his cousins is especially welcome. The front and back of two photographs from the early sixties are both reproduced, so we can see Jimi???s own annotations: a familiar snap of the rocking kings, with all the band members named, and a new color photograph taken by an airborne ‘Jimmy’ in jump school , from February of 1962. A fine new action shot of Hendrix with the squires\ in full cheetah regalia is also included. The photographs offer a pretty fair representation of Jimi???s career. There are also quite a lot of unpublished Hendrix shots on offer. The fine new shots from Munich 1966; ten photographs from Gothenburg between 1967 and 1969; Rotterdam 1967; Royal Albert Hall 1969; Indianapolis 1969; and Harlem 1969 are particularly valuable. The emphasis in the Illustrated Jimi Hendrix is on photographs of Jimi, rather than on facsimiles of manuscripts; nevertheless, the book does offer some new autographs and documents. Giuliano offers some original work as well: he spoke with al Hendrix in 1982 and Noel Redding in 1994, and provides transcripts of these interviews in brief appendices. The notes on the dust cover mention that Giuliano ghosted ginger baker’s forthcoming autobiography, and the text of the Illustrated Jimi Hendrix includes some intriguing new quotations from baker. But at the end of the day it’s really all the fine illustrations on offer which make it worthwhile to purchase this book.???
Joel J. Brattin, UnivibesNovember 1994

FACIST FOOD / CONFESSIONS OF A CORPORATE CLOWN

‘Ronald McDonald’ turns vegan, embraces animal rights and yoga’

???The clown is not laughing anymore.
The man beneath the Ronald McDonald costume has become one of the fast-food restaurant chain’s fiercest foes. Geoffrey Giuliano, who played the friendly clown in Canada in the early 1980s, says he now feels tremendous remorse for inspiring millions of children to love their happy meals. Now a vegan and animal-rights crusader, Mr. Giuliano says: ”Billions and billions served means billions and billions slaughtered.”
He is doing everything he can to make life difficult for his former employer. ”I’m going to use the fact that I was Ronald McDonald as a big stick to beat these (vulgarity) over the head,” he said. ”I want to get the word out: this is animal genocide.”
Mr. Giuliano, now 46, took the job playing the familiar red-haired character after he graduated from acting school. He earned a masters degree and was trained in the Shakespearean tradition. At the time, he took what he could get. The job, by the standards of most actors, paid very well. Mr. Giuliano says he made $50,000 a year, had a limousine driver and a penthouse office in the company’s Canadian head office in Toronto.
At first, he says, he thought the job would be rewarding. ”I had really big ideas that the Ronald McDonald Safety Show would help children not to drink bleach and set themselves on fire and things, so I learned it and did it.”
The turning point came, Mr. Giuliano says, when he began to believe the emphasis was on marketing rather than on safety.
The young idealist was overcome with guilt. ”It was madness, cheap, sullied and dirty. You could feel the dirt, and everybody just took with both hands. After a while, it got to be too much. My conscience got the better of me. These things stated to eat away at me, and over a few months, I decided, ‘I can’t do this anymore. This is just sick and pointless’.”
Mr. Giuliano’s next career proved very successful. He went on to write more than 20 books, mostly celebrity biographies, including works on the Beatles, Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Jordan and Ronald Reagan.
But even this career is one he is now losing interest in. ”What I care about now is teaching devotional yoga, ” he says in a phone interview from Rishikesh, India.
He now uses the proceeds from his writing career to subsidize his yoga-teaching project. He says he has more than 70 disciples in the U.S., India and Nepal. ”I’m the all-American-boy-turned-guru,” he says. ”I’m a natural-born promoter. What can I do?”
One of the things he most wants to do is to start a lawsuit against McDonald’s, although he does not specify what kind of lawsuit. ”I’m here to shut those (expletives) down,” he says. ”If you kill a dog, you go to jail. If you kill a cow, you’re a millionaire.” Mr. Giuliano now works with PETA — People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals –who have been responsible for such programs as ”Slam McDonald’s Month.”
???
The Ottawa CitizenNovember 25, 1999

ROD STEWART VAGABOND HEART
???This is the story of how he went from boozy soccer star-rock singer to glitz-and-glam, Hollywood-style pop star. It should be read as a cautionary tale by young musicians and as the fascinating story of an important pop-music force by pop culture enthusiasts.???
Mike Tribby, BooklistOctober 1, 1994
???The book scores big in it’s detailing of Stewart???s early career in such strange aggregations as steam packet (with long John Baldry) and shotgun express (a line-up that also included future members of Fleetwood Mac and Camel). There’s also his time with the Jeff beck group, which resulted in the seminal truth album.???
Birmingham PressNovember 20, 1993
???Geoffrey Giuliano provides a unique insight into the star, with the unmistakable sandpaper voice, bottle-brush hair and his unique style of showmanship. After nearly three decades, Stewart is still one of the most popular and sought-after rock stars around.???
Nick Jackson, Bolton Evening NewsDecember 11, 1993
???Very readable, it is a must for fans.???
Lesley Williams, South Wales Argus
???Anyone interested in Stewart will enjoy this book from an American who has certainly done his homework. He tells the remarkable story of how a young grave digger and footballer rose to become one of the world’s most famous rock stars and sex symbols. He explores his unparalleled flair for wine, women and football with plenty of controversy along the way. Giuliano talks to the ladies in Rod’s life, and finds out what mates such as Ginger Baker, Ron Wood, Elton John and Mick Jagger really think of him.???
Derek James, Evening NewsDecember 9, 1993
???Giuliano tells Rod’s story from his childhood and teenage years, when he worked as a gravedigger, sign painter, fence mender and apprentice soccer player, to his astounding solo music career. The feisty tartan rocker’s little-known dark side, as well as his self-admitted fear of failure, is unveiled as the double-edged sword that drives him yet holds him back. The author follows him through a seemingly-endless procession of leggy blondes and a wild rock-star life, to his present domestic happiness with Rachel Hunter. The result is a definitive account of Rod Stewart???s extraordinary life and loves.???
Express & EchoNovember 18, 1993
???Giuliano has already published several Beatles books, with grown-up titles like tomorrow never knows, so vagabond heart is clearly not intended as a hackish rodography. Indeed, after a few pages it becomes clear his model is Albert Goldman rather than George Tremlett. One virtue of the warts-only approach is that it raises questions which would be unlikely to arise in the course of the normal anodyne hello!-style jaunt through Rod’s greatest hits and misses.???
Ed Barrett, Modern ReviewNovember 18, 1993
???Well researched.???
John Naugton, QJanuary 1994

GLORIA THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF GLORIA HUNNIFORD
???She is the darling of BBC radio two. The bright-eyed, honey-haired, glamorous mature woman with the sing-song northern Irish accent. Gloria Hunniford loves people, her work and her family. Not necessarily in that order. Now she has written a book with Geoffrey Giuliano, biographer of the stars, whose successes include many books about the Beatles. The book is destined to do well amongst Gloria???s many fans. She was once voted the most popular radio disc jockey and there is little doubt people warm to her pleasant manner and wholesome Irish down to earth approach. But the getting together with Giuliano, for the book, was an unlikely liaison. ‘I interviewed him about one of his Beatles books and as he left the studio he asked me if I had ever done my story. I said, ‘oh god, no,’ but he went away and got the deal. Without him I wouldn’t have got around to doing it.???
Stephanie Bryant , Sussex Life
???Unlike other recent books that simply recycle familiar images, this volume offers new and interesting shots of Jimi Hendrix, as well as reproductions of posters, tickets, picture sleeves, and documents of various sorts… The book provides over twenty full-page photographs and scores of smaller photographs. Furthermore, the pictures (loads in color) are very well reproduced. There are some new pictures of members of the Hendrix family from Al Hendrix???s collection, and from the collection of Jimi???s aunt, Pearl Brown; the snapshot of a twelve-year-old Jimi with his cousins is especially welcome. The front and back of two photographs from the early sixties are both reproduced, so we can see Jimi???s own annotations: a familiar snap of the rocking kings, with all the band members named, and a new color photograph taken by an airborne ‘Jimmy’ in jump school , from February of 1962. A fine new action shot of Hendrix with the squires\ in full cheetah regalia is also included. The photographs offer a pretty fair representation of Jimi???s career. There are also quite a lot of unpublished Hendrix shots on offer. The fine new shots from Munich 1966; ten photographs from Gothenburg between 1967 and 1969; Rotterdam 1967; Royal Albert Hall 1969; Indianapolis 1969; and Harlem 1969 are particularly valuable. The emphasis in the Illustrated Jimi Hendrix is on photographs of Jimi, rather than on facsimiles of manuscripts; nevertheless, the book does offer some new autographs and documents. Giuliano offers some original work as well: he spoke with al Hendrix in 1982 and Noel Redding in 1994, and provides transcripts of these interviews in brief appendices. The notes on the dust cover mention that Giuliano ghosted ginger baker’s forthcoming autobiography, and the text of the Illustrated Jimi Hendrix includes some intriguing new quotations from baker. But at the end of the day it’s really all the fine illustrations on offer which make it worthwhile to purchase this book.???
Joel J. Brattin, UnivibesNovember 1994
???Gloria Hunniford has the sort of warm personality and distinctive honey tones people immediately recognize and usually like. She’s become an enduring radio and TV personality. But her sunny exterior and cheery banter hide some of the sadder experiences of her life. These are revealed – along with other, humorous moments and tender times – in her autobiography with Geoffrey Giuliano. It’s an evocative, very human tale of Mary Winnifred Gloria Hunniford, brought up in semi-rural Northern Ireland, in a world now-vanished of traditional family values and home-baking, of homespun entertainment and helping to bring in the harvest of her grandparents’ farm. Reading this book is an almost-familiar experience. It’s like finally meeting a long-time pen pal, or someone you’ve only ever spoken to on the phone. Well-worth reading , it’s the kind of book that leaves a cosy glow.???
Evening NewsDecember 4, 1993
???This is the winsome story of the glorious rise to fame from a modest start in her family’s two-up, two-down in Portadown , Northern Ireland . Her idyllic early recollections of haymaking on her grandparents’ farm, baking bread and making jam in her mother’s kitchen are a far cry from today’s whirlwind life of interviews, and TV and radio shows.???
Sunderland EchoDecember 18, 1993
???Perhaps to the surprise of many, Gloria Hunniford has become one of Northern Ireland’s most successful exports to mainland Britain . Assisted by author Giuliano, the diminutive ulster blonde tells all.???
Maris Ross, Publishing NewsAugust 13, 1993
???From humble beginnings to the queen of British broadcasting, Gloria reveals the career and personal life of one of Britain’s favorite radio personalities.???
Publishing NewsJuly 16, 1993
???Gloria Hunniford’s autobiography, by no means self-trumpet blowing, with a career at the age of 53 by no means over, seems to distill the very essence of what makes a personality. Suffice it to say that this is a very interesting autobiography, told with candor and much good humor. Giuliano and his wife Brenda with Deborah Lynn black have made a good team to produce the work.???
Peter AllenJanuary 1, 1994

THE ROLLING STONES ALBUM
THE BEATLES ALBUM / THIRTY YEARS OF MUSIC & MEMORIBILIA
???The definitive book on the rolling stones.???
John Tesh, Entertainment Tonight
???A more than five hundred photographs, many previously unpublished, highlight a lively look at rock ‘ n ‘ roll ‘s rolling stones, offering a combination of history, discography, and visual tribute and featuring an essay by the group’s former manager, the long lost Andrew Loog Oldham.???
Ingram
???Many thanks for the book. A unique collection of photos. Very professionally produced and so far I am enjoying it (even though it does remind me of how old I am).???
Tony McCraig, Senior Rolling Stones ManagementDecember 31, 1992
???In the field of pop/rock biographies, the lightning of success rarely strikes twice, let alone a multitude of times. Such is the case with rock-chronicler to the stars, Geoffrey Giuliano, and his latest effort, the Rolling Stones album. After a slew of best sellers on the Beatles, the stones seemed the next logical subject for Giuliano’s meticulous journalism. Giuliano’s book, the rolling stones album, is the first to have its material authorized by the rolling stones. And it is, as its sub-title denotes, thirty-years of music and memorabilia. It is a riotous whirlwind of events, color and Rock’N’Roll. As with his previous bio’s, Giuliano fares eminently in his account of the stones’ tumultuous history. Feuds, mischief – both small and banner-headline variety – drug busts, love and the nuts-and-bolts of the music business: none escape Giuliano???s scrutiny. The book takes you through the group’s inception, their glitzy mid-years right through their elegant, genteel present, and does so with detail and aplomb.???
John R. Ford, Niagara GazetteApril 21, 1993
???An amazing collection of memorabilia with anodyne accompanying text from Beatles specialist Giuliano. Old records, posters, photographs, sheet music, cover art work, bubblegum cards, pinball machines and promotional interns from every stage of both group and individual careers.???
London TimesJuly 9, 1993
???It is probably correct and not exaggerated to compare not fade away with a tour of Bill Wyman’s ‘sticky fingers’. Anyone who has sauntered past the wall of the London Caf? In astonishment will recognize the feeling when leafing through the over 250 pages. This is a documentary of the stones history in wonderful, rare, unusual and never before seen memorabilia that has been collected over the years. Over 800 photos (mainly color), tour posters, entrance tickets, programs, t-shirts also rare records and CD’s, picture discs and promos and much much more. It is great to browse through the history of the stones again. A great book, which clearly rises from the mass of stones publications. A book for everyone, both stones fans and stones collectors (the one need not exclude the other).???
Peter Winterstein, Basement News (Germany)June 1993
???At over 250 pages, tomorrow never knows, is a gigantic compendium of Rolling Stones empherea covering 30-years of rock’s most enduring stalwarts. Essential for the group’s fans it is also a fascinating graphic reference work. This must be the definitive collection of stones’ product from the 60s’ pop covers of teen beat to the elaborate wooden CD packaging of the final bow, complete with miniature bottle of Jack Daniels, mounted in a genuine leather base. In between, we get a look at every album and single cover 9 official and bootleg, every conceivable form of merchandise including the Stones’ pinball machines, jigsaws and t-shirts – over 1,200 items in all. At l20 it is very reasonably priced and certainly lives up to its back page blurb as the definitive illustrated history.???
Event (Music, Arts & Entertainments in West Yorkshire)June 1993
???A superb addition to the mini-library of books on the band once quite rightly hailed as the greatest in the world. Rock historian Giuliano has put together a truly amazing collection of Stones’ memorabilia which includes tour programs, t-shirts, posters, bubble-gum cards and much more. Strong on pictures and trivia rather than the well-documented tales of the band, this is a loving look at the stones for the true fan.???
Lancashire Evening PostDecember 19, 1992
???One of the best books of the year. Four stars!???
City LimitsJanuary 7, 1993
???The book is wholly unique…. It’s author infamous Beatle biographer, Geoffrey Giuliano, provides a solid account of the groups’ career. One thing’s for sure: though the band probably resent many of the opportunist publications that have appeared over the past thirty-years, purporting to represent the Stones, even they will probably be aghast at the scope of the book and the dedication that has gone into producing it. It’s a book that – Rolling Stones popcorn and promotional bottles of Jack Daniels included – does the group proud!???
Mark Paytress, Record CollectorJanuary 1993
???Not surprisingly, the Rolling Stones recorded their first tune in March, the month that comes in like a lion. To commemorate the 30th anniversary of this momentous musical event, Viking studio books is publishing the Rolling Stones album, a 250-page catalog of photographs and other riveting memorabilia compiled by rock historian Giuliano that’s guaranteed to give satisfaction to any stones fan.???
Karen Brailsford, ElleMarch 1993
???Maybe it’s only Rock’N’Roll, but this album treats it like the second coming, with 1,500 photographs, a complete discography, 30-years of tour dates, arcane and familiar memorabilia… If there is nothing about the rolling stones that doesn’t interest you, this is your book. Grade b+???
Entertainment Weekly1993
???Giuliano’s prose is terse and breezy, making for easy reading Giuliano keeps a light hand here, dutifully covering all the headline-making events, while avoiding a lurid, tabloid tone. Intriguing for fans, is the abundance of bootlegs, some quite imaginatively packaged that are covered in the book. The outlaw verve does more to suggest the Stones’ early rebel image than any of the big-business dealings one associates with the band currently. Still, the Stones roll on. But one has to wonder, as the concerts move further into Broadway spectacle and the music becomes an ever more faint whisper of its once mighty self, how much longer fans will continue to shell out for a mere taste of legend. As this entertaining, volume suggests that may be for quite a while longer.???
Curtis Ross, Tampa Tribune1993
???Giuliano’s book is an illustrated guide to stones’ picture sleeves and old magazine covers, with a text which is sampled from sounds, circa ’75: ‘it’s Keith Richards who…still embodies the streetwise, scrapping maverick that is the hallmark of the Rolling Stones.’ this is the book for those who go to gaze at rock memorabilia auctions, and come back with the catalogue.???
VoxJanuary 1993
???Tomorrow never knows and not fade away take a look at a huge selection of pop memorabilia, gimmicks, artwork, fanzines, and bootleg recordings. They were once common currency of the pop scene, but are now found in auction houses fetching thousands of pounds. Geoffrey Giuliano, an avid collector and rock buff, presents both lavishly packaged and illustrated books, fondly remembering the days when the Beatles and the Stones vied with each other for chart supremacy. The real value of these cherished pop relics lies not in their cash worth, but in their nostalgic ability to conjure up a flavor of those exciting days when the 60s were actually happening (man!). Ideal books for avid Beatles and stones fan or anyone with a fad for the swinging 60s.???
Antoinette Kent, Portsmouth NewsApril 24, 1993
???The book leaves no stones unturned, as it reveals the humble beginnings of gigs around London to mass concerts around the world to thousands of fans and, ultimately, reports on the solo careers.???
Julie Fulcher, Uxbridge GazetteApril 14, 1993

BLACKBIRD / THE LIFE AND TIMES OF PAUL McCARTNEY
A LONDON SUNDAY TIMES BEST SELLER
???Giuliano’s update of his best selling 1991 original follows McCartney through his first foray into classical music with “the Liverpool Oratorio”, his work with animal rights, the reunion of the ‘Threetles’ to cut new songs for the ‘anthology’ albums, and wife Linda???s bout with breast cancer. Also included are excerpts from recent interviews and an updated discography. This may be more poplar now than when first released!???
Michael Rogers, Library JournalNovember 1, 1997
???Prince Paul conquers the world as a Beatle, then daringly starts his own group (wings) and lives forever after in tight- fisted happiness with his lady Linda. Giuliano begins with a 90-page rehearsal of the fab four = s career…he then turns to the marriage of Linda Eastman and McCartney. Potentially of interest, this union of a son of a cotton factor and a daughter of a Cleveland heiress. Denny Laine, who played guitar in wings for several years, does provide some interesting insights. Money: McCartney was always making excuses for not paying us properly by saying his money was all tied up in the Beatles company, apple… I was kept in the dark all the time about money, just given a check now and again. Recording: a he and Linda did smoke a fantastic amount of stuff by anybody’ s standards…so much of it makes you very indecisive and takes away your self-confidence. That’s why Paul???s albums take him ages to make. He cannot be decisive about anything. Laine left the band when McCartney was arrested for drug-possession in Tokyo. In subsequent years, McCartney forbade the band to carry any drugs across the border. This prohibition, says Giuliano, did not apply to Paul himself; he used the hood on his daughter’s coat and his son’s diaper as stash bags. Thirty-two pages of b&w photos.???
Kirkus Reviews1991
???The most prolific and commercially successful of the Beatles, Paul McCartney has made musical waves for over three decades. In Blackbird, Beatles insider Giuliano unfolds the whole story of McCartney’s contradictory character, colossal talent and presents the real Paul. 90+photos.???
Ingram
???Blackbird is a fair, balanced, well-researched text with a great deal of previously untold information to accompany the man’s history…Giuliano is a recognized Beatles author whose highly-acclaimed books grace the shelves and collections of most followers of the fab four…until McCartney writes his own memoirs, and dares delve into certain subjects perhaps considered taboo, blackbird serves as the definitive book on the ‘cute Beatle’ for open-minded Macca Mavens worldwide.???
Charles F. Rosenay!!!, Good Day Sunshine, The International Beatles Magazine
???Giuliano deserves kudos for his even-handed approach…we get a behind-the-scenes look at the singer’s frolicking, bed-hopping escapades, his stinginess with money and his irrational devotion to marijuana.???
Michael Dunn, Tampa Tribune-Times
???A definitive work on an ex-Beatle… Contains an incredible volume of fresh facts on the real Paul McCartney, not the public persona Giuliano???s frank, unbiased account will be the best you’ll ever get.???
John R. Ford, Niagara Sunday Gazette
???Straightforward…paints an evocative picture of McCartney and his mates. ???
San Jose Mercury News
???Most revealing…poignantly describes McCartney???s love-hate relationship with John Lennon and chronicles the Beatles break up in painful detail.???
Chattanooga News-Free Press
???An expansive study…takes us on a magical mystery tour of the singer-songwriter’s life.???
Wilmington Sunday News Journal
???This fab book finally puts the record straight!???
The Echo, SunderlandNovember 5, 1991
???Giuliano is refreshingly frank in assessing McCartney???s creative output, particularly in the wings and post-wings era…the book is a quick, entertaining read with quite a bit of new material. ???
Larry Lipkis, Library JournalOctober 1, 1991
???A complete a look at McCartney as has been published to date. With its musical and personal family trees, chronology and post-Beatles discography, Blackbird should be welcomed by many McCartney fans. ???
Lynne Francek Urian, Publication Unknown
???Giuliano’s definitive biography unravels the complicated life of the world’s most popular, most powerful and richest musician of his time. Illustrated with many rare photographs.???
Loughborough Echo/Shepshed EchoNovember 1, 1991
???Based on interviews with McCartney himself and close friends, the volume takes an authoritative look at the original musical group and its complex inter-relationships, following its rise and fall before going on to trace Paul???s own later work. A generous galley of candid snapshots, many of them from Beatle buff Giuliano???s own collection, add yet another interesting element to a book already full of new facts and re-evaluations.???
Anniston StarJanuary 5, 1992
???It occurred in October of 1980 in the tiny village of Tenterden, in Kent. Wings had been rehearsing in a manor house when they heard the terrible sounds of a car crash outside.
Laine recalls: “Apparently, this young Japanese au pair girl was taking their infant daughter, Cara, for a walk in her pram when this supposedly drunken driver tried to overtake another car and knocked them both down. The baby flew up into the air and landed unhurt by a hedgerow, but the poor au pair was very badly injured.”
Dashing outside, McCartney and Laine instructed Wings’ road manager Trevor Jones to get the van and drive the little girl and her hysterical mother to a nearby hospital while they did what they could for the semi-conscious young woman until help arrived.
“I was actually the first to reach her, but Paul dove right in and started nursing her, trying to do what he could. I mean he certainly wasn’t frightened of blood.
“It was obvious to both of us she had suffered very severe internal injuries and that unless there was some kind of miracle she probably wouldn’t make it. I remember there was blood pouring out of her ears . . . It was just terrible.
“To make matters worse, being so far out in the countryside the ambulance took well over an hour to wind its way through the area’s twisting, largely umarked, lanes. McCartney, however never moved an inch, all the while sitting there by the side of the road, cradling her head in his lap.”
Laine reflects: “Paul was just saying things like,’It’ll be all right, luv, don’t worry,’ but we were getting no response. At one point he glanced over at me and slowly shook his head. He knew. We both knew. Still, he just sat there stroking her long black hair, talking and sometimes even singing softly as she lay there dying.”
That evening, in an East Sussex hospital, 21-year-old Hisako Kawahara died of her injuries. Out of respect for her privacy, McCartney ordered a tight media ban on his assistance.
“I’m a bit of a coverup,” McCartney commented in October of 1986. “There are many people like me in the world who don’t find it easy to have public grief. But that was one of the things that brought John and I very close together. We used to talk about it, being 16 or 17. We actually used to know how people felt when they said, ‘How’s your mother?’ and we’d say, ‘Well, she’s dead.’ We almost had a sort of joke; we’d have to say, ‘It’s all right, don’t worry.’ We’d both lost our mothers. It was never really spoken about much; no one really spoke about anything real. There was a famous expression: ‘Don’t get real on me, man.’ ”
Perhaps the most telling tale as regards McCartney’s inability to either exhibit real emotion or open up to those around him has to do with his father’s passing. Denny remembers:
“We were in Paris. Wings had just done a great show so we were all in pretty high spirits. Afterwards we shuffled down to the press conference.
“I remember Paul was struggling to answer all these typically mundane questions from the media . . . Eventually this one guy pipes up and asks Paul if either of his parents are still living, to which he offhandedly replies simply, ‘No.’ ”
At that point Laine just about fell off his chair. McCartney had never so much as mentioned a word to anyone about his father’s death, which both surprised and hurt the sensitive Laine.
“Over the years I’d become pretty close to old Jim,” he confides. “and I was pretty upset that Paul had never bothered to let me know what was up. You see, Paul is very publicly shy in some ways but unfortunately, he’s also quite privately shy as well.???
Calgary HeraldNovember 24, 1991
???Giuliano acknowledges assistance from some fifty sources from Liverpool, London and North America…. Wings and McCartney fans will enjoy the book’s collection of very rare photographs….???
Faith Rosanne Corman, Publication Unknown
???This latest in the line of Beatle biographies is perhaps the most insightful we’ve had the pleasure to read…the book remains a substantial look into the life of Paul McCartney. The amount of research the author undertook adds credence to many of the facts and stories. His use of interview subjects suggests that many of the stories, however strange, must be true…at the end of the book is a complete solo discography (up to ‘all my trials’), a list of promotional releases as well as bootlegs and an extensive bibliography. These lists alone are worth the price of the book! With lots of interesting stories and just the right amount of dirt (a lot of which is directed toward Linda and Yoko) blackbird is an enjoyable read. Until Paul writes his own autobiography, this is probably the closest and most accurate look at McCartney as his fans will ever get.???
Penny Lane Press
???Knowing most of the characters personally, I was very impressed by Giuliano???s accurate and revealing prose… A classic! ???
Ginger Baker Of Cream and Blind Faith
???Blackbird: The Life and Times of Paul McCartney, by Geoffrey Giuliano; McGraw-Hill Ryerson; 384 pages; $ 24.95
Blackbird is more of a post-Beatles investigation of McCartney and contains interesting snippets for trivia fans. To its credit, it is not a piece of flattery.
Fans with an abiding interest in McCartney would like Blackbird???
The Ottawa CitizenDecember 22, 1991

THE BEATLES’ ALBUM
THIRTY-YEARS OF MUSIC AND MEMORABILIA
???Page-turningly enjoyable.???
Sunday Times
???Very lavish… Gorgeous color shots of the boys and all sorts of rare and bootleg record covers.???
Daily Telegraph
???American Geoffrey Giuliano may be the world’s most devoted Beatles fan. He has written biographies of George Harrison, Paul McCartney and, with Julia Baird, co-wrote John Lennon, My Brother.
Here he presents a coffee-table collection of more than 800 postcard-size photographs of record covers – singles, bootlegs, tapes, compact discs, albums to acetates – along with pictures of posters, fan mags, calendars and innovative point-of-purchase displays. In short, ample evidence that Timothy Leary’s “divine messiahs” were universal masters of musical merchandising.
And if you thought the Beatles were done years ago, Giuliano gathers up all the detritus of their post-Apple careers to show how the individual Beatles continue to pursue the most eye-catching ways of presenting pop music. He also throws in a chapter on the output of relatives and friends, including Yoko Ono, Julian Lennon and Denny Laine.
The Beatles Album falls short as a picture gallery. Fewer than 30 of its 256 pages are devoted to portraits or candid shots of the Fab Four and most of those cover familiar territory – John and Yoko bedding in Amsterdam, Paul piano picking with Michael Jackson, George musing with Ravi Shankar and Ringo recording with George Martin.
The Beatles Album matches its hype as “the definitive iconographic salute” and includes a lot of album sleeves that were only seen overseas. For a collector, it’s an essential catalogue. ???
Michael Kane, The Vancouver SunFebruary 1, 1992
???Featuring rare photographs from their pre-fame days, a complete visual record of the career of the Beatles offers more than 1,500 previously unexhibited rare items, including never-before-published promotional materials.???
Ingram
A multipound panegyric of more than 800 stunning photographs… This book is a treasure trove of musical lore and artistic memorabilia that will, like the talented troupe itself, captivate readers of several generations.???
Burrelle’s News Service
Where else will we see such great stuff as rare photos of the fab four and pictures of their classic memorabilia? This is a must have for Beatle maniacs everywhere.???
Flint Michigan Journal
An Ali Baba’s cave of Beatlemania … A visual rockumentary feast and a lavish, entertaining journey through the trippy renaissance known as the sixties.???
John R. Ford, Gannett Newspapers
A bound museum of Beatles-o-bilia.???
Karen Krenis, Rochester Times-Union
My bet for the very best Beatles book ever! Giuliano is the undisputed godfather of Beatle memorabilia and lore. Both the author and his book are one of a kind treasures.???
Anthony Violanti, Buffalo News
A glossy memoir of rare artifacts and previously unpublished photos that’s already an international best seller.???
Deborah Lynn Black, Upstate Magazine
???Giuliano is the big mother of all Beatles collectors. He even has stuff on the rutles in this new volume dedicated to the memory of the first super group. Items include rare record covers, photos, bootlegs and a pile of other once worthless junk which now changes hands for fortunes all over the world. The book also includes many previously unpublished photographs.???
Bristol ObserverJanuary 30, 1992
George was always the quite one and since taking a step back from his own successful solo career following the breakup of the Beatles, Harrison has been a truly reclusive figure. Covering his childhood and life during and after the fab four, this updated edition includes Harrison???s take on the resurgence of Beatlemania following the release of the three recent anthology CDs. This remains a necessary acquisition for all libraries!???
Library Journal

DARK HORSE / THE PRIVATE LIFE OF GEORGE HARRISON
???Very well organized and informative.???
Sunday TimesJune 18, 1990
???Even handed and soundly researched… With new interviews and previously unpublished material.???
Parke Puterbaugh, Rolling Stone magazineAugust 23, 1990
???Giuliano offers fans everything they could want in a star biography, well researched details balanced with a healthy dose of dishy dirt.???
Forrest Rogers, Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionAugust 18, 1990
???George was always the quite one and since taking a step back from his own successful solo career following the breakup of the Beatles, Harrison has been a truly reclusive figure. Covering his childhood and life during and after the fab four, this updated edition includes Harrison???s take on the resurgence of Beatlemania following the release of the three recent anthology CDs. This remains a necessary acquisition for all libraries!???
Library Journal
???What actually makes Giuliano???s opinion worth listening to is the depth of knowledge and affection he has for the Beatles in general.???
Tony Kenwright, Liverpool Daily PostDecember 12, 1989
???A wealth of information…detailed and intensely interesting.???
Kirkus ReviewsFebruary 15, 1990
???A balanced package that far outdistances Albert Goldman’s the lives of John Lennon, interesting stories here.???
Victor Emerson, Ottawa CitizenDecember 10, 1989
???A well woven tapestry of biographical data, recollections and anecdotes. Giuliano paints excellent word portraits of those he chronicles… The author shoots from the hip and lets the reader think for himself… Giuliano treats the reader to a smooth, detailed narrative…Dark Horse is a warm, compassionate book… Impressively thorough. For baby boomers, Beatles??? fans and lovers of good biographical works alike, it’s well worth reading.???
John R. Ford, Niagara Falls GazetteApril 13, 1990
???WHAT did George Harrison think of Beatlemania? “The split-up of the Beatles satisfied me more than anything else in my career. Being a Beatle was a nightmare, a horror story. I don’t even like to think about it.” On another reflective occasion, he offered: “”We were just a bunch of loonies, taking drugs and trying to be honest.” And what did the others think of him? A friend from the Beatles’ early Hamburg days, Astrid Kirchherr: “”George was lovely. Wide-eyed, innocent, open and very loving and warm. He always looked up to John . . . it was sometimes difficult for them not to see George as something of a pain for being so young.” And John Lennon himself, the de facto senior Beatle, was pungent about Harrison years later after Yoko Ono had taken over Lennon’s life. Apparently Harrison disliked her from the first and Lennon repelled anyone who wasn’t as enraptured by the lady as he was. Harrison had been talking to Bob Dylan and commented: “”Dylan says she gives off bad vibes, I happen to agree.” Later Lennon said: “”I should have hit the bastard.” So much for the friendship forged over a decade of scrabbling for gigs and finally making it as the world’s foremost rock-pop group. However, Giuliano quotes Ono in his closing comment on his subject. “”You can never unknow what you know,” she told Lennon, and the biographer admits that was his guiding dictum in writing this definitive history of this great artis. Admittedly, Giuliano, the author of three other books on Beatlemania and possessor of a huge collection of memorabilia, was exposed to the phenomenon from 1964 and makes his attitude toward Harrison plain right from the start. He suggests that the guitarist-songwriter “”through his rather astounding body of work has contributed a great deal of insight into the amazing journey that is life”. Even with that sympathetic approach, to the biographer’s credit Harrison emerges as an undoubtedly flawed human being despite his devotion to Asian philosophies and his generous financial support of their devotees. He was heavily into drugs, forbade his first wife Pattie Boyd to continue her modelling career while he did what he pleased, and wasn’t above seducing colleagues’ female partners including Ringo Starr’s first wife. Harrison has never sought the spotlight, hates being pursued by reporters and photographers, guards his privacy with an almost paranoic fervor and has rarely spoken out on any subject. Depending on his mood and, at one stage, the effect of drugs, he could be an amiable companion, though not exactly a magnetic personality. In some ways you can feel sorry for this multi-millionaire who lives reclusively in a Henley mansion built by eccentric turn-of-the-century solicitor Sir Frank Crisp, one of whose whims was to construct a water-filled grotto beneath the place. Friar Park is what Harrison calls home and where he abides with his second wife Olivia, and their son Dhani. But all this wealth that would keep fed a million of the Indians who gave the world the philosophies Harrison espouses doesn’t seem to have altered the man’s essentially sombre outlook. Giuliano talks of Harrison’s feelings of being unworthy and weak, so much so that it was almost too much for him to bear. Inside remained an emptiness that no amount of comfort or money could ever hope to fill. A few years ago the once dynamic musician and poet was adrift on a sea of inner turmoil and hopelessness. “”All that beautiful music, it seemed, had somehow spiraled its way right out of his world-weary soul,” says Giuliano. In 1983, Harrison looked older than his 40 years and car racing was one of the few areas of his life for which he retained enthusiasm. He admires Hitler and has many pictures of the dictator around his home. Friends maintain it is merely a fascination one might feel for a character in a bad movie. On the positive side, Harrison and his manager, Denis O’Brien, started Hand Made Films in 1978, and it has made notable films with the Python team and Bob Hoskins. Harrison, the least-known Beatle, has always managed to be his own man, says his biographer. He has remained aloof, living quietly, sniffing his coke, making his music, pursuing spiritual truths, an encouragement to others. Be that as it may, he and the other three owed an incalculable debt to the public who put them on that despised pedestal. In their path followed all the other rockers, who became filthy rich themselves. What have they all contributed to human progress? Amusement and a little philosophy. At least the tortured Harrison seems to have tried to put some of it back into circulation. HARRISON . . . music and drugs.???
Courier-MailSeptember 24, 2003
???The book deserves an audience beyond just Beatles??? buffs.???
David Vickerman, Birmingham Post1989
???Dark Horse reveals every aspect of Harrison’s life in rich detail.???
Norma Huth, Park Newspapers1990
???Intense…a practical diagnosis…???
Melanie Chandler, Vancouver SunNovember 25, 1989
???This book is a must for anyone interested in the serious aspects of rock or pop music.???
David Bristow, London Times1989
???Giuliano emerges as perhaps the top rock writer of the day.???
Drew MacKenzie, News Of The World Sunday magazineApril 1, 1990
???If I were a rock biographer I???d head for the hills with the likes of a 24-carat writer like Giuliano about.???
Judy McGuire, News Of The WorldJuly 17, 1990
???It’s been many moons since a biography like dark horse has hit the streets. Although I???ve personally known George Harrison for over twenty-five-years, I actually feel a lot closer to the real man after reading Giuliano???s masterful book.???
Denny Laine, of The Moody Blues and Wings1989
???I expect I???ll just leave it around the house so my wife can read about all the extra-marital affairs I???m supposed to have had and all the drugs I???m supposed to have taken.???
George Harrison, London TimesNovember 19, 1990
???The world’s greatest Rock ???N??? Roll biographer!???
Olivia Harrison, The Independent1992

JOHN LENNON / MY BROTHER
???Julia Baird and Geoffrey Giuliano have penned a loving portrait of the former Beatle and received the full cooperation of Paul McCartney who contributed a foreword and an exclusive interview. There are also a number of fascinating photographs from the Lennon family album, many of which have never been published before.???
Mike Green, Chester City ChronicleSeptember 2, 1988
???Takes a more positive, loving view of Lennon.???
Ron Netsky, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle1989
???John Lennon/My Brother is clearly an event. It’s also a sensitive personal memoir…her childhood memories are fascinating and the picture of John that emerges from their Trans-Atlantic phone calls from 1975 on is a warm, human one… Though Paul remembered her and Jacqui only slightly, he was obviously struck by the sincerity of Julia???s intentions and agreed to an interview. His good-natured memories of the young John are another plus for this worthwhile book, for which he also wrote the foreword…in short, John Lennon/My Brother is well worth investigation???
Club Sandwich, Paul McCartney’s personal fan club publication
???A kinder and more convincing version than Albert Goldman’s.???
Peter Rhodes, Express & Star, WolverhamptonSeptember 9, 1988
???A personal, moving account, focusing on her brother’s formative years…???
Scott Wheeler, Sunday EnterpriseMarch 26, 1989
???An affectionate story, naturally filled with genuine love. The book has an intimate, conversational quality the transatlantic telephone conversations, recalled in vivid detail in the book, reconstruct one of the most heart-rending reunions ever committed to the page…???
Greg Quill, Toronto StarSeptember 17, 1988
???Julia Baird’s tender memoir John Lennon, My Brother, co-written by Geoffrey Giuliano, sets out to counter the oft-repeated lies that Lennon had a tough, lonely and deprived childhood, that he had been abandoned by his mother and lived in poverty and grief. Written as much to defend their mother, Julia, as her brother, Baird’s book is insightful, witty and affectionate. And though she lost contact with him after The Beatles were swept away from Liverpool by the hurricanes of sudden fame, the Lennon she creates is quite real, quite fallible, quite gifted, quite loving and perfectly human.???
The Daily Telegraph, Sydney AustraliaJune 17, 2004

THE BEATLES / A CELEBRATION
???A refreshing new look. A number of fresh tidbits. A deluxe view of a genuine phenomenon. A delight to read and a definite eye treat.???
Keith Rienhard, Chicago Daily MirrorDecember 12, 1986
???I’m very impressed by the book. It doesn’t bitch about the Beatles. It’s very refreshing and beautifully presented.???
Mary Hopkin1987
???Bob Wooler here, I used to be at the cavern club with the Beatles in the sixties. I’ve just come across Geoffrey Giuliano???s book and it’s fantastic. I’ve never seen a book like it before and believe me, the Beatles themselves will be knocked out by it as I am. It’s a fantastic, fab book!???
Bob Wooler, The Beatles’ first compere
???Written by their greatest fan ever, this book truly lives up to its title.???
Ron Roland, Time Out magazine
???Moments of deep revelation.. Fascination…???
Robin Duke, West Lancashire Evening Gazette
???Filled with enough photos, and anecdotes and memorabilia to satisfy any fan of the fab four.???
Renee Enna, Rosemont Times1986
???A truly fabulous book!???
Whispering’ Bob Harris, LBC Radio, London1986
???Geoffrey Giuliano is certainly not your ordinary author!???
Virginia Lucier, Middlesex NewsDecember 16, 1986
???A glossy memoir of personal interviews and previously unpublished photos that’s already an international best seller. The first book since the hunter Davies’ text to be written with the full cooperation of the Beatles.???
Deborah Lynn Black, Sunday, Democrat and Chronicle, RochesterMarch 29, 1987
???A wonderful book with some great new photos…???
Johnny Walker, All Forces Radio,BBC World Service
???I was proud to see it in print. An excellent summary of the Beatles??? career with some fascinating illustrations.???
Spencer Lee, BBC Radio, Liverpool, Author of Let’s Go Down To The Cavern
???This stunning collection of Beatlemania material, including never-before-published interviews and rare photos, commemorates the colossal impact the fab four had on popular culture in the turbulent 1960s.???
Ingram

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